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Garbage, grit and the Hambletonian miracle
William F. Reed
September 13, 1971
In the continuing saga of New York's Antonacci family, which used a sanitation biz as the springboard to victory in the 1969 trotting classic, they again invoke some lofty assistance, reinvade Du Quoin—and win!
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September 13, 1971

Garbage, Grit And The Hambletonian Miracle

In the continuing saga of New York's Antonacci family, which used a sanitation biz as the springboard to victory in the 1969 trotting classic, they again invoke some lofty assistance, reinvade Du Quoin—and win!

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Tom Antonacci remembered to call his mother, Amelia, who was born in Italy and now resides in Copiague, Long Island. She reminded him of something he had forgotten in the excitement: it was her 66th birthday.

In the Crown Carting Company, Frank works outside with the drivers and trucks while Tom stays in the office and tends to bookkeeping. Somebody asked Tom if he planned to give his employees a day off to celebrate.

"I'd like to, but I can't," he said. "You know, the garbage must be picked up no matter what. Look," he added, "I love the horses, but garbage is my bread and butter."

Sure. In the meantime, other owners had better start worrying about the 1973 Hambletonian. Remember that mare Missile Toe? Speedy Crown has a little sister named Speedy Toe, just a yearling now, which means she will be the right age for Du Quoin in two years. The Antonaccis own her. Beissinger will train and drive her. Just remember to have plenty of hors d'oeuvres, Bill Hayes.

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