SI Vault
 
BANNED IN BOSTON, KNIGHTED IN MONTREAL
Jack Olsen
October 18, 1971
In storybook fashion, Canadien Ken Dryden slew the Bruin beast and lived to slay another day. Here he tells of wondrous times
Decrease font Decrease font
Enlarge font Enlarge font
October 18, 1971

Banned In Boston, Knighted In Montreal

In storybook fashion, Canadien Ken Dryden slew the Bruin beast and lived to slay another day. Here he tells of wondrous times

View CoverRead All Articles View This Issue
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14

A. Well, for example, a guy'll come up to you and say, "You're the greatest!" And you realize, first of all, he's just plain incorrect, and secondly you know that he doesn't mean you're the greatest, anyway. It's just that you happen to be there at the time, and he thinks you're pretty good, and he wants to make an impression on you, so he upgrades the whole thing and says, "You're the greatest," even though he doesn't really mean it. Pretty soon you're overwhelmed with the silliness of things like that, and you just want to get away. The worst part of it is these people mean well. They like you, they admire you and they have your best interests at heart, but after a while it makes you tired of yourself and your sport. I went through about two weeks of hero worship in Canada, and it was almost enough to make me want to quit hockey.

Q. Then you went to Washington to work for Ralph Nader over the summer, and I'll bet things were different.

A. After a few weeks in Washington I began to regain my old love for hockey, and I began to miss Montreal. I used to call Montreal information just to hear the operator answer the phone in French and English.

Q. What did you do for Nader, and what did you learn?

A. I worked on a program to organize sport and commercial fishermen into a national arm to combat water pollution. What I learned was that there is a tremendous inertia in the people, and there are many many serious problems involving government and bureaucracy. I'm writing an article on the subject right now.

Q. Yes, I suppose that your writing keeps you from being bored when you're not studying law or playing hockey. A fellow has to fill in his free time.

A. Right.

Q. Do you think that you might go into some sort of public service after you get your law degree?

A. I hope so, but I also hope I can stay involved in public service in the meantime. Of course, I don't intend to quit hockey for a long time. At least until hockey quits me.

Q. Does goaltending offer enough of an intellectual challenge to you? I mean, a guy who's worked for Ralph Nader might get a little bored trying to stop Bobby Orr's slap shot.

Continue Story
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14