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HOW THEY DO RUN ON
Dan Jenkins
November 01, 1971
From the Ivy League to the West Coast, running backs are grabbing both ball and spotlight away from their quarterbacks, piling up so much yardage—even mileage—that pro scouts are drooling
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November 01, 1971

How They Do Run On

From the Ivy League to the West Coast, running backs are grabbing both ball and spotlight away from their quarterbacks, piling up so much yardage—even mileage—that pro scouts are drooling

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"Fastest starter and best gearshift in the country. Too small for running back in the old-fashioned sense but a game-breaker deluxe if you can get the ball to him. Might be tremendous receiver."

Jeff Kinney (6'2", 210):

"If he had real speed, it would be unfair. Runs and catches. Fine athlete who could play quarterback if he had to. Won't burn it up in the open field but is the Hornung-Gifford type who'll beat you one way or another."

Billy Taylor (5'11", 200):

"Flashy and hard to knock down because of his build. Not all that fast but he runs under people. Good moves and terrific balance. A question about durability and ability to catch."

Calvin Harrell (6'1", 222):

"Might be the best blocker in college today. A Dave Osborn type, durable, just a big old strong kid. Could use more speed, but powerful inside. A leader and hard worker. He'll knock you down."

Lydell Mitchell (6', 200) and Franco Harris (6'2", 225):

"Maybe the best tandem in the East since Davis and Blanchard. Mitchell has quick feet and strong legs. He's a hundred-percenter and a game-breaker. Harris is the fastest of the big men. Has the physique and combined power and speed to be unbelievable. Both can block and catch as well as run."

Woodrow Green (6'1", 190):

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