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Hold on, Ara, the freshmen are coming
Pat Putnam
November 01, 1971
While the Notre Dame varsity was getting lumped at South Bend, the first-year men were south of the Rio Grande bullying the Mexico City Redskins in a bruising display of hands—and arms, etc.—across the border
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November 01, 1971

Hold On, Ara, The Freshmen Are Coming

While the Notre Dame varsity was getting lumped at South Bend, the first-year men were south of the Rio Grande bullying the Mexico City Redskins in a bruising display of hands—and arms, etc.—across the border

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The defense, which spent most of the night watching the offense score, gave up but 127 yards while intercepting seven passes and recovering four fumbles. The Redskin quarterbacks, not one of them over 5'8", threw 23 passes, but mostly they were just tossing the ball up for grabs. They completed five fewer than they had stolen.

The result was hardly a surprise to the Mexicans. All week during practice there was a running gag. Someone would place a helmet on the ground and then others would come over and pretend there was a player underneath it—one stomped upon by a Notre Dame player.

"Ah, we'll win by 48 points," said Elias Yapur, an optimist whose brother Jose is a 179-pound linebacker on the team.

"You are crazy," said Manuel Rodelo, the Redskins' dynamic little coach.

"You mean you don't think you can win?" someone asked Rodelo.

He laughed. "No," he said, "but to play Notre Dame will be good for football in Mexico. Everyone thinks we only play soccer. We love to play American football very much. But we have much problems, like getting money for equipment. It is too expensive."

Yapur held up a hand. "We would be very appreciative if someone would tell the people in the United States that we would gratefully receive any donations for equipment." So be it.

The Redskins play in the Mexican Major League, but unlike the other nine clubs in the league, they have no affiliation with a university. Rodelo coached for 14 years at the National Polytechnic Institute in Mexico City, running up a 145-6-2 record, but he quit in disgust two years ago over the program.

"I wanted to have just one team," he said, "but the people who drive football there know nothing. They are happy to have three teams, all of them bad. They got money for football, but no one knows where it goes."

"Ha," shouted Yapur. "I'll show you where it goes. After practice I'll take you to the Hipodromo, the racehorse track."

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