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19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
November 15, 1971
GROUND GAINERS Sirs:Congratulations on realizing that the Ivy League has as much brawn as it does brains. Your acknowledgment of Cornell's Ed Marinaro (How They Do Run On, Nov. 1) was very much deserved. It has been a long time since someone has dominated the league like Ed has.
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November 15, 1971

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

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GROUND GAINERS
Sirs:
Congratulations on realizing that the Ivy League has as much brawn as it does brains. Your acknowledgment of Cornell's Ed Marinaro (How They Do Run On, Nov. 1) was very much deserved. It has been a long time since someone has dominated the league like Ed has.

While playing fewer games than Steve Owens, Marinaro has surpassed his rushing record. If that does not earn him the Heisman Trophy, nothing will.
RICHARD SCOFIELD
Stamford, Conn.

Sirs:
Dan Jenkins mentions the Houston Veer T and fails to acknowledge that Houston's Robert Newhouse is one of the best exponents of the triple option. Newhouse gained 182 yards against Alabama's vaunted defense in 22 carries (compared to Musso's 123 yards in 22 attempts). Newhouse followed with 192 yards in the Florida State game. Newhouse is also obvious in the "stats," ranking third in the country behind only Marinaro and Pruitt with 1,096 yards in seven games.

Speaking of Marinaro, since when did the Ivy League defenses become so excruciating to run through? Eastern sentiment should not play such a large role in the selection of ground gainers.
CARL F. RILEY
Houston

Sirs:
Bernard Jackson, senior tailback for Washington State, is constantly rolling up yardage against the Pacific Eight's best defenses. After WSU's fantastic upset of Stanford, in which he gained 141 yards on 24 carries, Jackson went into battle the next week against Bobby Moore of Oregon. While leading WSU to a 31-21 victory, Jackson set a WSU record by outgaining Moore 261 yards to 161 and took over Moore's Pacific Eight lead in rushing.
JEFF BARBER
Spokane

Sirs:
Your article really brought out the fact that this year's college teams are loaded with excellent backs. But you failed to mention Wisconsin's Rufus (Road Runner) Ferguson. Rufus has been the leading scorer in the Big Ten and, in my opinion, he is the best running back in the conference.
GERRY AYERS
Ridgeway, Wis.

REASON TO RUN
Sirs:
Kenny Moore's sensitive insight into the world of cross-country running (They Take the Scenic Route, Nov. 1) is superb, not only for its content but also because it reflects the efforts of SI to continue to explore the meanings man has attached to his multidimensional sport form.
R. E. LYNDE
Rohnert Park, Calif.

Sirs:
I read with great enjoyment your article on cross-country. Seldom have you captured so well the esthetic side of a sport. You have made vivid to the reader a fact known by all cross-country runners: it is fun to run. Thanks.
RALPH G. POWELL
Coon Rapids, Minn.

COACH MOTTA
Sirs:
Congratulations to Frank Deford for his fine article on Dick Motta, coach of the Chicago Bulls (Beware, Little Big Man Is Here, Oct. 25). It is great to see a man work his way to the top as Motta has, starting with junior high school and progressively earning his way higher. So many of the coaches in pro basketball today are ex-players with no previous coaching experience. It's nice to know that the man who works hard for success still has a chance to make it.
BOB LEACH
Whittier, Calif.

Sirs:
Thank goodness one NBA owner had the excellent judgment to seek out and, more importantly, to hire a coach and not just another NBA reject. There are other Mottas out here, coaches who can coach, who love the game and believe in playing it as a team effort. However, so far, too few owners have wised up. Instead, they hire, fire and rehire the same tired ex-players and ex-coaches.

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