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19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
May 15, 1972
DERBY WEEKSirs:I have been a subscriber to your magazine for many years but never have I seen or read a better article than When the Sun Shines Bright (May 1) on Kentucky Derby Week, as depicted by W. B. Park. Sport would be little more than an exercise for participants if it were not for the spectator, and Artist-Narrator Park performs the difficult task of placing the reader in the midst of the crowd—be it in the unforgettable infield or the inaccessible penthouse. Mr. Park obviously glistened through the playing of My Old Kentucky Home and cheered a winner or two across the finish line at Churchill Downs. Allow me to thank him for extending to the rest of your readers a bit of the euphoria we Kentuckians are fortunate enough to experience the first week in every May.PHILLIP BRUCE LESLIEGreenup, Ky.
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May 15, 1972

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

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1971 SENATORS

1972 RANGERS

April 5 45,061

April 21 20,105

9 25,079

22 5,517

10 6,412

23 11,586*

11 24,358*

24 5,561

12 7,392

25 10,213

108,302

52,982

* denotes Sunday game

DERBY WEEK
Sirs:
I have been a subscriber to your magazine for many years but never have I seen or read a better article than When the Sun Shines Bright (May 1) on Kentucky Derby Week, as depicted by W. B. Park. Sport would be little more than an exercise for participants if it were not for the spectator, and Artist-Narrator Park performs the difficult task of placing the reader in the midst of the crowd—be it in the unforgettable infield or the inaccessible penthouse. Mr. Park obviously glistened through the playing of My Old Kentucky Home and cheered a winner or two across the finish line at Churchill Downs. Allow me to thank him for extending to the rest of your readers a bit of the euphoria we Kentuckians are fortunate enough to experience the first week in every May.
PHILLIP BRUCE LESLIE
Greenup, Ky.

Sirs:
Artist Bill Park's depiction of Derby Week was right on the beam, and he rekindled my enthusiasm to journey the 500 miles that separate me from Louisville. You don't attend a two-minute horse race when you attend the Derby; you experience an unforgettable piece of Americana.
DANA L. RIVERS
Davenport, Iowa

SWITCHED HITTERS
Sirs:
Your May 1 article on the Texas Rangers (New Home on the Range) was not only offensive but misleading. Harold Peterson gives the distinct impression that the Rangers (former Senators) have found paradise in the Dallas- Arlington- Fort Worth community. I should like to bring to Mr. Peterson's attention some interesting statistics concerning the attendance figures for the first five Texas Ranger games compared to the 1971 Washington Senators.

As a long-suffering fan, I hope this says something for Washington. It has always been a good baseball town and still is. Sure, you can blame the strike for the low attendance figures, but Texas was supposedly baseball-hungry. As far as I am concerned, Bob Short has done it again, and he deserves it. As everyone knows, the Rangers will finish last in the American West for three reasons: 1) their manager is Ted Williams; 2) their owner is Bob Short; and 3) with Toby Harrah at shortstop, how far can you go?
PATRICK MCCLOUD
Annandale, Va.

Sirs:
Being a Washington sports fan, I've had it with comments being made about the capital by those dime-a-dozen Texas Rangers. I was hardly surprised when that .100 hitter, Toby Harrah, said Washington baseball fans were impolite. If he was excited by his ovations from the 20,105 "friends and neighbors" at the Rangers' opening game this year, then maybe he should try and think back to the first game of the 1971 season; Toby Harrah received many ovations from the 45,000 fans for his performance against Vida Blue and the Oakland A's.

It is about time those Rangers from Texas learned to play the game and forget the cheap comments about Washington. Washington is better off without Bob Short and is looking to the future for another team. We don't need the Rangers' rudeness.
TOM SCHAEFER
Elon College, N.C.

THE THOMASES' GAME
Sirs:
Hooray for SI! A major article on lacrosse (One Stick Rebuilds the Hopkins Dynasty, May 1) right up there in front between the new baseball (ugh!) season and the Stanley Cup and NBA playoffs. Even though lacrosse suffers from a definite lack of exposure in the national media, it remains the sport here, "in the only part of the nation where such a curiosity can exist," to quote Larry Keith.

While the exploits of Jack, the youngest Thomas, are obviously material for an article, those of his father are long overdue for recognition. The lacrosse dynasty Bill Thomas has established at Towson High is unequaled anywhere in the nation. Coach Thomas is currently bidding for his 11th consecutive Baltimore County championship, and his teams have a record of 107-7-1 since 1961. Approximately 40 Towson players have become All-Americas in college. Thomas' greatest pride as a coach comes in seeing every boy who plays for him go on to college through lacrosse.

So while we devotees of the fastest sport on two feet anxiously await any future lacrosse articles you may send our way, we thank SI for bringing the famous lacrosse name of Thomas to nationwide attention. Maybe next time you will feature the father and thus see part of the reason behind the accomplishments of the son.
BOB HALL
Cockeysville, Md.

Sirs:
I was ecstatic to see lacrosse get some well-deserved coverage in the person of my brother. Jack Thomas, who really is lacrosse, motherhood and apple pie!

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