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THEY LEFT US SINGING THE BLUES
William Johnson
July 03, 1972
In what may have been their last appearance as a team, those wily Italians, the Kings of the Cards, easily topped the Aces and the rest of the pack to win the bridge Olympiad and their 13th world title
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July 03, 1972

They Left Us Singing The Blues

In what may have been their last appearance as a team, those wily Italians, the Kings of the Cards, easily topped the Aces and the rest of the pack to win the bridge Olympiad and their 13th world title

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Doom was written on their game as early as the sixth board. Wolff and Jacoby were playing a four-spade contract against Forquet and Garozzo, and the normally conservative Forquet had doubled. A rich total of 12 IMPs lay ahead for the Aces if they made the contract, but they would lose 8 IMPs if they did not. It was a most important moment, for the Blues had leaped into a quick 18-0 lead. In order to make the hand, Jacoby had to take an early, daring finesse through Garozzo toward Forquet. Had it been anyone but Forquet, Jacoby probably would have tried it. Against the stony-faced Neapolitan he backed off, choosing not to take the gamble. The Aces went down, the Blues soared. The Aces rallied mightily later on but never could gain any momentum against the magnificent Squadra Azzura. The final score was 203-138.

Whether the Blues are really retired for all time—or only until next year, when the Aces defend their Bermuda Bowl world championship—remains to be seen. If, as Benito Garozzo said, they will play "never again," then the fourth Olympiad in the plastic land of Miami was indeed an event to remember.

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