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THE TAKING PART
William Johnson
July 10, 1972
Ah, it was this, not winning, that the little baron with the big mustache said was important about his Olympics. But would Al Oerter, Harry Edwards and the gang at Hawaiian Punch agree? The first of three parts
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July 10, 1972

The Taking Part

Ah, it was this, not winning, that the little baron with the big mustache said was important about his Olympics. But would Al Oerter, Harry Edwards and the gang at Hawaiian Punch agree? The first of three parts

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And Baron Pierre de Coubertin, founding father of it all, said: "The Olympic movement tends to bring together in a radiant union all the qualities which guide mankind to perfection."

WUXTRY! OLYMPIC GAMES
ENFOLD COKE, INTERNATIONAL
HARVESTER, NORTHWESTERN
MUTUAL, CHARLIE CHAN, IRVING
BERLIN & FLOWERS OF ARYAN
MAIDENHOOD!!!

Commerce: During ABC's telecasts of the 1972 Olympics these concerns will pay $48,000 per minute to advertise: the Coca-Cola Company, International Harvester Company, The Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance Company, Jos. Schlitz Brewing Company, Sears, Roebuck and Co., Texaco Inc., Warner-Lambert Company and Toyota Motor Distributors, Inc.

Drama: In 1937 Twentieth Century-Fox studios made Charlie Chan at the Olympics, starring Warner Oland. The story involved the Hindenburg, the theft of a robot pilot and the 100-meter freestyle at the Berlin Games.

Science: During the 1904 Olympics in St. Louis there were Anthropology Days, in which members of "savage and uncivilized tribes" competed. "The world had heard of the marvelous qualities of the Indian as a runner..." an official account of the Games stated. "It had read much of the strength of the Kaffir, of the remarkable athletic feats of the Filipinos, and of the great agility and muscular strength of the giant Patagonians. All these traditions were spoiled. In actual competition, the representatives of the savage and uncivilized tribes proved themselves inferior athletes.... An Americanized Sioux Indian won the 100-yard dash in remarkably slow time, and an African Pygmy in the same event made a record that can be beaten by any 12-year-old.... The Patagonian could throw the shot only 10� feet."

Music: The first time Irving Berlin ever wrote both the lyrics and the melody of a song was in 1909 when he composed Dorando. The subject was Dorando Pietri, the poor, brave, broken little Italian marathon runner who wobbled into White City Stadium during the 1908 Games, stricken and dizzy but leading the pack. Eager Englishmen actually helped him across the finish line, and Dorando was disqualified. A sampling of the lyrics to Dorando by Irving Berlin:

Dorando! Dorando! He run-a,
run-a, run-a, run like anything.
One-a, two-a hundred times around da ring.
I cry, 'Please-a nun ga stop!'
Just then, Dorando he's a drop!*

Love: In 1936 one of the least celebrated but most interesting elements was the Love Garden behind the Olympic Village. Not every Olympian knew about it, but one who did was Paul Martin, then a middle-distance runner for the Swiss team. Today he is 71 and an orthopedic surgeon. Although he won a silver medal in the 800-meter run in 1924, Dr. Martin is more famous as the only man to compete as a runner in five consecutive Games.

Still remarkably energetic, Dr. Martin recently said: "The Olympic athlete in Berlin was elevated to a godlike creature. The Germans had even reserved a sort of heavenly forest near the Olympic Village for these gods. And there the prettiest handpicked maidens would offer themselves to the athletes—especially to the good Aryan types. Olympic babies born out of such encounters were cared for by the state. There was every indication that this Woods of Love was a matter of state policy by the Nazis.

"The maidens were usually sports teachers or members of Hitler's Bund Deutscher M�del and they had passes to enter the village and woods and mingle with the athletes. It was a lovely beech forest which had a pretty little lake, and the place was tightly ringed by Schupos [police] so no one would disturb the sportive couples.

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