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HAPPY DAYS ARE THERE AGAIN
William Leggett
August 28, 1972
The White Sox blaze as Dick Allen saves his homers for the days and Wilbur Wood's knuckler continues to amaze. Even the scoreboard seems to faze foes in Chicago where the Sox are a new craze
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August 28, 1972

Happy Days Are There Again

The White Sox blaze as Dick Allen saves his homers for the days and Wilbur Wood's knuckler continues to amaze. Even the scoreboard seems to faze foes in Chicago where the Sox are a new craze

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Back in 1967 and 1968 snipers picked two policemen off their motorcycles near the ball park and another sniper sprayed bullets at cars in the adjacent parking lot. Lights were installed outside the park to help deter crime, but the danger was as much imagined as real. According to a police survey compiled during the Sox' worst days, both Chicago Stadium, the usually jammed home of the Black Hawks and Bulls, and Wrigley Field, where the Cubs have drawn over a million fans for the fifth straight year, are located in higher crime areas than Sox Park. Word of mouth about the area plus a bad team drove attendance down to 390,000 in 1969, excluding the 11 home games they played in Milwaukee that year. The revival of the White Sox also is a revival for a baseball axiom: "Give the fans a winner and they will come out to see it."

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