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RUNNING UNDER THE RAINBOW
Robert F. Jones
October 16, 1972
Outgoing champion Stewart raced through sun, fog and wind to lead incoming champ Fittipaldi to the pot of gold at the end of the Grand Prix
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October 16, 1972

Running Under The Rainbow

Outgoing champion Stewart raced through sun, fog and wind to lead incoming champ Fittipaldi to the pot of gold at the end of the Grand Prix

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Though Stewart tweaked a few heartstrings among his fans by showing puffs of blue smoke in the early going, his Tyrrell-Ford clearly had the legs of the field. By the halfway mark Jackie had built a half-minute lead over his teammate Cevert and Hulme in the Yardley-McLaren. Then a spattering of rain at the midpoint slowed the cars and spawned a rainbow over the course, a fitting reward for all the gloom of qualifying. And it presented a fitting symbol as well for Stewart's second American victory.

He poured around the course and under the checkered flag at a record average speed of 117.483 mph—more than two miles an hour faster than Cevert's victorious ride for Tyrrell at The Glen last year. As Jackie collected his prize money and adulation in the victory enclosure he showed his only forbearance of the day: he kissed Trophy Queen Ellen Griesedieck as if she were a cousin. And then—with a Scottish twinkle in his eye—he turned Ellen over to runner-up Cevert for Gallic honors. Cevert promptly demonstrated the kiss that made his nation famous and wobbled la Griesedieck's knees in the process. "I think," said Helen Stewart to her husband, "that you put that girl in bad hands." Jackie laughed and went off to count his blessings.

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