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19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
November 13, 1972
THE SERIES Sirs:Congratulations for doing your usual fine job of covering the World Series (Mustaches All the Way, Oct. 30). Once again it was demonstrated that good pitching dominates, and while that of both teams was excellent it would appear that Oakland's staff was just a little better than Cincinnati's. Catfish Hunter, Blue Moon Odom, Rollie Fingers, Ken Holtzman and Vida Blue were too much.CARL F. REISS Clemson, S.C.
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November 13, 1972

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

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Incidentally, we are also taking the "love" out of tennis and putting in more excitement with our 21-point games. Despite the absence of love, we will certainly have lots of lovely ladies playing in our league.
M. CHARLES REICHBLUM
President
National Tennis League, Inc.
Pittsburgh

IN THE GROOVE
Sirs:
I have never written to a magazine before, but I felt I had to thank you for the article The Way to a Super Bowl (Oct. 23) by Don Johnson. It was very informative and beautifully illustrated. My husband and I bowl for fun but I was having trouble with my delivery and follow-through. After reading the instruction, I realized what I was doing wrong and my score has already started to improve.
MONICA SHIPLEY
Kansas City, Kans.

Sirs:
Thank you for a long-awaited article on Don Johnson and bowling. Although it is the nation's favorite participant sport, bowling has received almost no attention in national magazines. I hope that this article will start a trend.
THOM E. GLASS
Millersville, Pa.

DR. OUTLAND
Sirs:
I was a little surprised by the statement by Mike Reid concerning his lack of knowledge of John Outland, donor of the Out-land Trophy awarded each year to the outstanding lineman in college football (SCORE-CARD, Oct. 9). Outland was not only a very good lineman at Pennsylvania, he was named an All-America tackle one year (1897) and the next year an All-America halfback, a double honor that few if any other players have received. He became a respected surgeon in Kansas City, Mo., and was among the first physicians to use an airplane in his practice. He also coached University of Kansas football in 1901, was the father of the Kansas Relays in 1923 and served as a football official for years. It would seem to me a fine thing that thousands of people do remember Dr. Outland 75 years after some of his accomplishments.
WINSTAN L. ANDERSON, M.D.
Lawrence, Kans.

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