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19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
February 26, 1973
NEW YORK VS. BOSTON Sirs:I must take exception to your Feb. 12 article 97-Pound Weaklings No More. The New York Rangers only play like 97-pound weaklings in championship hockey games.
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February 26, 1973

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

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NEW YORK VS. BOSTON
Sirs:
I must take exception to your Feb. 12 article 97-Pound Weaklings No More. The New York Rangers only play like 97-pound weaklings in championship hockey games.

Mark Mulvoy must remember that hitting is part of hockey and the Rangers and Bruins have been hitting each other for more than 40 years. It is only recently, however, that New York and Boston have been engaged in playing championship hockey and, as usual, the Rangers have choked.

New York has not had a championship NHL team for more years than I can remember, because the Rangers just do not win big games. The 7-3 victory over Boston that Mulvoy writes about was not the end of the world for the Bruins. We all know that regular-season play does nothing more than make money for the owners and entertain the fans while the players jockey for playoff berths.

When the WHA appealed to the growing greed of professional athletes, the Bruins were dealt a severe blow by the loss of Goalkeeper Gerry Cheevers and Center Derek Sanderson. Now the Turk is back. Watch the Big Bad Bruins beat the 97-Pound Weaklings in the playoffs.
JOHN E. PARISI
Marion, Mass.

Sirs:
Mark Mulvoy did an excellent job of capturing the Rangers on and off the ice. I think the Rangers have proved that when they are healthy they can be one of the toughest teams in hockey. Emile Francis deserves much of the credit for putting together a team of experience, youth and skill.

As for the Boston Bruins, go back to your cage!
HOWARD SCHREIBER
Glen Rock, N.J.

Sirs:
It was a long time coming, but nevertheless your article was great. This may finally be the year the Rangers win it all—Stanley Cup, Prince of Wales Trophy and the Vezina Trophy (Go, Eddie and Gilles).
REGGIE LANSBERRY
Rowayton, Conn.

Sirs:
Perhaps the saying "the truth hurts" is applicable here, but I don't think so. Your Feb. 5 and 12 issues featuring the Knicks and Rangers finally winning the big ones over Boston were downright insulting. The Celtics still have the best record in basketball and the Bruins will be Stanley Cup champions again. Anyone is entitled to a letdown, especially with the pace the Celts have set. When playoff time comes, Boston will once again show its supremacy. This year, though, in more than one sport.
MARK D. GROSSMAN
Bangor, Maine

GOALIES
Sirs:
I am thrilled. I didn't know that you knew there was a Pittsburgh hockey team. At last you have recognized the Penguins by letting Jim Rutherford describe how it is to be a goalie (Watch Out, Here It Comes! Feb. 12). Thank you, SI and Mark Mulvoy, for letting the great little goalie from the Penguins take over. And thanks to Melchior Di Giacomo for some excellent photographs.
BRUCE WEINMAN
Avalon, Pa.

Sirs:
The pictures were excellent and Jim Rutherford told it like it is. But your failure to include two of the greatest goalies was just too much. Your article would have been complete if you had just pictured Gilles Villemure and Gerry Desjardins. Villemure's record speaks for itself. Desjardins' is terrific but his team's isn't. Nonetheless, thanks for putting in Eddie Giacomin. He is the best goalie of them all.
GLENN MACLOSKY
Spotswood, N.J.

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