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19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
April 23, 1973
CALL TO WORSHIP Sirs:Your April 9 baseball issue was most satisfactory reading and especially the Dick Young article on the game (It's Religion, Baby—Not Show Biz).
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April 23, 1973

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

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Sirs:
So UCLA is the NCAA champ again, eh? So what else is new? As a Virginian I may be somewhat biased, but it seemed to me that the last half of the NIT championship game between Notre Dame and Virginia Tech had more action than the entire NCAA series held in St. Louis.
GEORGE V. EVANS, JR.
Charlottesville, Va.

PROUD BEAUTY
Sirs:
The almost full-page trash scene that ends the pictorial section of the article Curtain Up on the Musters (April 2) is great and I hope people will consider this picture mentally next time they begin to litter. Augusta is our course and we are proud of it and its beauty.
GLENN CALVERT
Columbia, S.C.

SPEED BANK
Sirs:
I was saddened to read in SPORTS ILLUSTRATED (Oh, Lord, He's Perfect, March 26) that yet another promising colt, Secretariat, will be retired to stud after his 3-year-old season and will be unable to demonstrate his racing ability in his prime years. Again the racing fan will be deprived of being able to see top-quality horses over a long period of time. This and similar events are as detrimental to both racing and breeding as is the fact that great geldings such as Kelso have been unable to pass along their genes to future generations. Neither of these conditions needs to exist. With a slight investment (certainly a fraction of the $6.1 million value of Secretariat) and a modernization of breeding rules, techniques of sperm storage and artificial insemination for thoroughbreds can be developed, if they have not been already. Promising stallions could then be regularly shed of sperm and their genes stored frozen for future mares or immediately passed along to a contemporary mare. Shed sperm should provide for numerous inseminations. The stallions could then race or even be gelded with no loss to the breeders in the first instance and a great gain in the second. Imagine Kelso's son racing a 5-year-old Secretariat. Isn't that what it's all about?
ERNEST F. DuBRUL
Oak Ridge, Tenn.

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