SI Vault
 
19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
June 04, 1973
WHOSE ADVANTAGE? Sirs:Thank you very much for your article covering the match between Margaret Court and Bobby Riggs (Mother's Day Ms. Match, May 21). It portrayed Riggs in true form—as a scheming old man. In my opinion the only good thing resulting from the encounter was the "Bobby Riggs Bleah!" buttons.DAPHNE KARAS Studio City, Calif.
Decrease font Decrease font
Enlarge font Enlarge font
June 04, 1973

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

View CoverRead All Articles View This Issue
1 2 3 4 5

THE ENGLISHMAN'S GAME
Sirs:
Thank you, thank you for the delightful article by John Fowles (Making a Pitch for Cricket, May 21). It was perceptive, enjoyable, informative and written with flair and discernment. (I am also grateful that he did not abuse the word "chauvinist," as has been done these past years, apparently in an attempt to find a new descriptive term for the normal male.)
EDITH LANG BLAKE
Detroit

Sirs:
Your story about cricket mentions a Philadelphian, J. B. (Bart) King, and credits him as the first bowler to use both right- and left-hand curves. My late father was an ardent admirer and close friend of Mr. King and once told me this story about his great skill as a bowler.

In the early 1900s, the Gentlemen of India visited Philadelphia to play a series of matches against a team of cricketers that included King. One member of the Indian team was a prince who was regarded at the time as the world's finest batsman.

King bowled the prince on the first ball, whereupon the prince walked to the opposite end of the crease, reversed his bat, as in a sword presentation, and gave it to King.
JOHN HART KNOX
Clearwater Beach, Fla.

Sirs:
At last the heretofore inscrutable game of cricket has been made comprehensible and even appealing. John Fowles' sterling prose was a pleasure to read.

I wonder whether one of your writers will take up the implicit challenge and write an article successfully explaining America's enduring love of baseball to the English.
PETER RICH
Los Angeles

DEMON SPEED
Sirs:
I cannot truly express my interest as I read your article on the Indy 500 and Art Pollard's death (The Deadly Wrath of Old Man Indy, May 21). Robert F. Jones did an excellent job of "personifying" the Speedway. I am not an avid fan of the sport, but I could become one now.
BILL WHELAN
New Rochelle, N.Y.

Sirs:
It is a crying shame that another human life has been sacrificed for the sake of speed, meaning, of course, the tragic death of Art Pollard at Indy. Not being a race car enthusiast, I hold a very dim view of this "sport." Just what are they trying to prove by attaining a speed of 200 mph? Where are they going at such a blazing pace? My answer is nowhere, and they are going there fast. For my part, I prefer the sport of kings, good old-fashioned horse racing with the class of good thoroughbreds, a la Secretariat.
WILLIAM F. O'BRIEN
Cincinnati

Sirs:
I was very disappointed with Robert F. Jones' article concerning Art Pollard's death at the Indy Trials. I agree that it was very unfortunate that Pollard crashed, but blaming "Old Man Indy" and referring to the Speedway as a nasty ogre proudly guarding his domain is wrong. If a race car driver is out to break 200 mph, he must take into consideration all the dangers inherent in such an undertaking.
JIM HUMMEL
Barrington, R.I.

Sir:
In Robert F. Jones' article it is stated that Johnny Rutherford's time of 45.21 seconds to complete the oval was "roughly, 16 heartbeats short of the big 200." Since the "big 200" means that the 2�-mile oval is circled in 45 seconds or less, this implies that Rutherford's heart rate was, roughly, 16 beats per .21 seconds, or about 4,570 beats per minute. It seems unlikely that Rutherford was that excited at the prospect of achieving the "big 200." More likely, Jones mistakenly used 72 beats per second, rather than 72 beats per minute, as the average heart rate. The correct result is that Rutherford was—incredibly—only about� heartbeat short of the "big 200."
BACH SELLERS
Sudbury, Mass.

Continue Story
1 2 3 4 5