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NOT QUITE A TERRAPIN STEW
Peter Carry
June 11, 1973
In the NCAA lacrosse championship, a stall by underdog Johns Hopkins held mighty Maryland for a while. But a cluster of All-Americas and a hot-shooting freshman named Urso saved the day in overtime
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June 11, 1973

Not Quite A Terrapin Stew

In the NCAA lacrosse championship, a stall by underdog Johns Hopkins held mighty Maryland for a while. But a cluster of All-Americas and a hot-shooting freshman named Urso saved the day in overtime

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Then Hopkins, taking advantage of penalties, replied with three straight goals to lead 8-6. The Terrapins cut the margin to one on a blind, over-the-shoulder heave by O'Meally as he cut in front of the crease guarded by Ferguson. Again Hopkins opened up a two-goal edge before first Urso and then Schreiber made rushes through the middle to tie the score.

Throughout the fourth period and into overtime, the goaltending on both sides was extraordinary, particularly by Matthews, who stopped nine Maryland shots in the last quarter, many of them from point-blank range. But the best save of the day was one that Bill O'Donnell did not make for Maryland. At 3:50 of the first overtime, he scrambled out against Hopkins' Thomas for a missed shot behind his goal. Just as the ball was about to bounce out of bounds, Thomas grabbed it and tossed it blindly over his head. Midfielder Dale Kohler caught the ball in front of the goal and fired a shot at what would have been an open Maryland net if Ed Glatzel had not alertly stepped into the crease. "We have a deal where the defenseman away from the ball is supposed to cover the crease whenever the goalie leaves," Glatzel explained. "I've had a few saves on plays like that this year, but that's the first one on which I ever really saw the ball. This one came right at me and I was able to knock it away."

All that remained then was for Urso to score the winning goal at 1:18 of the second overtime. It was a 15-yarder—a long shot under such critical circumstances—but in maneuvering, Urso discovered that he could not see Matthews. "I figured if I couldn't see him, then he couldn't see me, and I let it go."

The ball deflected off the back of Hopkins' Bob Barbera into the goal and that decided one more ho-hum championship.

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