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SCORECARD
Edited by Martin Kane
August 13, 1973
A LOOK AT MINICYCLES
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August 13, 1973

Scorecard

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Jack Nicklaus: "Don't lock me in. I'm not an employee of the TPD. If they want me to play in 12 of the 15, that's something else. But you've got 15, plus the four big tournaments, plus certain others you want to play. That's 22 or 23 tournaments. I want to cut back, not expand."

Arnold Palmer: "With other tournaments outside the country that I want to play, and with my personal business, well, that's just an awful lot of golf. They might lose me."

Gary Player: "If you're saying what I think you're saying, I'd have to give up the American tour. They can't expect me to fly over here every two weeks or 10 days. And what if one of these tournaments was opposite the South African Open? They couldn't expect me to miss that."

COMEBACK FOR CATHY

A swimming clich� of recent years has been that girl swimmers can no longer succeed in world-class competition after they are 17 or so. According to Cathy Corcione, a former Olympian who now swims for Princeton at the age of 20 and will compete Aug. 15-25 at the World University Games in Moscow, this is nonsense. Donna de Varona, former Olympic swimming champion ( Rome and Tokyo), agrees with her. Donna, retired at age 17, now feels that women swimmers peak at about 23.

According to Cathy, who quit at 15, she just got fed up with the rigors of training. Those who retired at such an early age, she said, "are probably worn out from the long hours of training and the pressure of competition.

"At nine I was practicing 2� hours a day," she recalled, "and by the time I was 11, I was training twice a day. I was swimming 10 miles a day.

"I didn't think about boys. I rarely had dates. When I got through one workout I would go home and rest until the other one."

But now Cathy is back in the pool again. She decided to try for a comeback when she got to college.

"Swimming was fun again," she explained. "I am sure the length of a swimmer's career depends more on her state of mind than anything else."

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