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SCORECARD
Edited by Robert W. Creamer
October 08, 1973
POLITICS IMany people are against the amateur sports bill that Senator John Tunney is sponsoring in Congress. They are fearful of intrusion by government into sport, and so are we. But marathon runner Kenny Moore contends the bill is the only reasonable way to end the serious division in American sports administration that has existed for more than half a century. Moore writes: "The absurd sanctioning wars and disqualifications by both the NCAA and AAU in recent years have been the inevitable consequence of this basic schism, and barring a staggering reversal of character, conciliation is not at hand. Mediation in the past by such referees as Douglas MacArthur, Theodore Kheel and Archibald Cox (now assigned to an easier case) failed utterly. The issue is not which do you trust, the private sector or government control. Rather, it is how a solution can be effectively imposed upon the intransigent groups. The Tunney bill trustbusts the AAU's hold on eight Olympic sports, permitting each to be administered by those who know it best. It prohibits the NCAA from arbitrarily disqualifying student athletes from international competition. It is not disruptive, except of those structures that have kept the people in amateur sports at the barricades for so long."
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October 08, 1973

Scorecard

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POLITICS I
Many people are against the amateur sports bill that Senator John Tunney is sponsoring in Congress. They are fearful of intrusion by government into sport, and so are we. But marathon runner Kenny Moore contends the bill is the only reasonable way to end the serious division in American sports administration that has existed for more than half a century. Moore writes: "The absurd sanctioning wars and disqualifications by both the NCAA and AAU in recent years have been the inevitable consequence of this basic schism, and barring a staggering reversal of character, conciliation is not at hand. Mediation in the past by such referees as Douglas MacArthur, Theodore Kheel and Archibald Cox (now assigned to an easier case) failed utterly. The issue is not which do you trust, the private sector or government control. Rather, it is how a solution can be effectively imposed upon the intransigent groups. The Tunney bill trustbusts the AAU's hold on eight Olympic sports, permitting each to be administered by those who know it best. It prohibits the NCAA from arbitrarily disqualifying student athletes from international competition. It is not disruptive, except of those structures that have kept the people in amateur sports at the barricades for so long."

POLITICS II

The fear of government meddling in sport is not an idle or capricious one. Consider the Soviet Union, which once again has allowed politics to confound its athletics. After the military coup in Chile overturned the Marxist government of Salvador Allende, the U.S.S.R. called the new rulers "brutal reactionaries" and broke diplomatic relations. Embarrassingly for the Soviets, on Sept. 26 a soccer team from Chile was in Moscow to play the Russians in the first game of a home-and-home series, part of the elimination round competition for the 1974 World Cup. It was a taut game, with the Chileans holding off the superior Soviet team to achieve a 0-0 tie.

But despite intense interest, the match was neither televised nor broadcast in Russia, and newspapers gave only the score and a paragraph or so of details. The situation is decidedly awkward for the Soviet politicians, because the second game between the two countries is scheduled to be played later this autumn in Chile. Obviously, the Soviets would prefer not to go there. But if they don't, they face almost certain elimination from the World Cup.

YET ANOTHER

Southern California Attorney Gary Davidson, a founder and first president of both the American Basketball Association and the World Hockey Association, will shortly move on to his most ambitious project yet—the World Football League.

Davidson envisions an innovative league of 12 teams kicking off on three continents next fall. He says franchises are already being developed in Tokyo, Honolulu, Toronto, New York, Boston, Los Angeles and Tampa. Cities under consideration for the remaining sites are London, Osaka, Mexico City, Chicago, Houston, Memphis, Birmingham and Charlotte.

Davidson expects five more owners to join within the next few weeks, each paying more than the founders' rate of $100,000 but a whole lot less than the $12 million it would take to get into the NFL. Already signed up are:

Los Angeles: Davidson.

Tokyo: Steven Arnold, an attorney and player-management specialist who lives in San Francisco.

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