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19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
October 29, 1973
KING NATE Sirs: Barry McDermott's article Tiny Does Very Big Things (Oct. 15) was about as together as Nate Archibald is in his life—on and off whatever court, an NBA floor or a playground in the Bronx. In the world of pro basketball Archibald is truly king of Kings!RUSS WALBRUNMenasha, Wis.
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October 29, 1973

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

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KING NATE
Sirs:
Barry McDermott's article Tiny Does Very Big Things (Oct. 15) was about as together as Nate Archibald is in his life—on and off whatever court, an NBA floor or a playground in the Bronx. In the world of pro basketball Archibald is truly king of Kings!
RUSS WALBRUN
Menasha, Wis.

Sirs:
The article on Nate Archibald was quite beautiful and took me on a reading experience down roads I never before had traveled. Barry McDermott wrote of reality. Congratulations on the purest article ever written in SI.
HONEYCOMB JACOBS
Ithaca, N.Y.

Sirs:
Congratulations on your fine in-depth article on Nate Archibald. However, I have to correct your statement, "At UTEP he never averaged more than 16 points a game."

In his junior year Archibald averaged 22.4 points per game. In his senior campaign Tiny averaged 21.4 points per contest, led the Miners to the Western Athletic Conference title and was a unanimous ail-conference selection. Under Head Coach Don Haskins, Archibald was not called upon to score big; defense was the name of the game.
BOB NITZBURG
Sports Director
KELP-TV El Paso

Sirs:
Nate (Tiny) Archibald is indeed living proof that a good little man can beat a good big man. Archibald has already established this fact by his amazing accomplishment in 1972-73 when he became the only player ever to lead the NBA in scoring and assists in a single season. Well do I remember Tiny when he performed with the Cincinnati Royals before the club was transferred to Kansas City- Omaha. We miss Tiny here in Cincinnati, but I for one am still following his good fortunes with the Kings. Here's wishing this little man continued success in a big way.
WILLIAM F. O'BRIEN
Cincinnati

CHANEY'S TURN
Sirs:
I thoroughly enjoyed your pro basketball issue. Your articles on Tiny Archibald, season previews and pro referees showed excellent perception. I must take exception, however, to your grave disservice in all three
instances to Boston's fine guard Don (Duck) Chancy. In the Nate Archibald piece Chaney appears in a picture with Archibald and Boston's John Havlicek but is mistakenly identified as Paul Silas. The scouting report on the NBA's Atlantic Division mentions Chaney in an afterthought as "the other Boston guard"; and in "The Highest Accolade Is Silence" an NBA coach is quoted as saying a referee shouldn't "care whether it's Oscar Robertson or Don Chaney he's making a call on." Chaney, a heads-up player who scores 13-plus points per game and who is, after Walt Frazier, second to none among NBA defensive guards, deserves a good deal more respect. I am sure he has Oscar Robertson's.
ALAN PERRAULT
South Weymouth, Mass.

Sirs:
I knew Don Chaney was underrated, but I didn't think it was that bad. Although he was overshadowed at Houston by Elvin Hayes and in Boston by John Havlicek, Jo Jo White and MVP Dave Cowens, Chaney is, in my opinion, one of the best guards in basketball. Excellent on defense, he is probably the premier guard at rebounding, both offensive and defensive. He is also very adept at driving in for layups, and he is improving on his outside shot.

I hate to disagree with you but let me be the first to say that the Boston Celtics are going to win all the beans in the NBA Atlantic this year, and Don Chancy will be a contributing factor. Look for Chaney to be on the All-Star team in the near future.
FRED WONG
Boston

THE ABA LIVES
Sirs:
Must the fans of the ABA who still care to read SI endure another season of prejudiced professional basketball coverage? One becomes used to rifling through SI and finding action shots and articles only about NBA players. But then to read the subtle little potshots at the ABA even when an ABA team had beaten a top NBA team is too much (Changing the Guards, Oct. 15). In that same article Peter Carry made another typical comment when he wrote, "The ABA, in another try at making its inferior—though rapidly improving—game...."

Did you happen to make note of the "inferior" league's record against the NBA in exhibition games this year? Let me at least review it for you. Of the 25 games played the ABA won 15 and lost 10. But then, the NBA was too busy taking the ABA "to school" to show them how superior they are, weren't they? Come on. We know there are many improvements to be made, but please give credit where it is due.
MRS. WILLIAM AUSTIN
Indianapolis

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