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19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
June 03, 1974
CELTIC PRIDE Sir: Peter Carry states (A Matter of Celtic Pride, May 20) that it was actually the Bucks who were more unyielding in holding Boston considerably under its 109 points per game regular season average. However, he fails to mention that Boston held Milwaukee well under its season average of 107 points per game. In fact, the Bucks scored fewer than 90 points in four of the seven playoff games, scoring more than 100 points in two games only because they went into overtime. Boston clearly was stingier and outplayed Milwaukee throughout the series. Please give credit where it is due.DANIELE SCHIFANO Milwaukee
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June 03, 1974

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

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The Eagles have a strong chance of challenging Washington and Dallas later on this year, and the 76ers are rebuilding slowly but surely.
SAM HAUPT
Moorestown, N.J.

HANDS OFF
Sir:
It is sometimes said, "There's no difficulty so hopeless that it can't be made worse with 'aid' from the Federal Government."

SI's SCORECARD (May 13) plainly pointed out that the Federal Government is about to stretch its already far-reaching tentacles even farther and put a bureaucratic stranglehold on amateur sports.

There might be more to say for the proposal if the Federal Government had demonstrated greater ability to manage the many affairs already within its purview. But nothing it touches becomes any less complicated or troublesome, and there is no reason to believe it would perform any better in the arena of amateur athletics.
D. E. PORTER
Oklahoma City

Sir:
The inevitable consequence of further government involvement in sport will be the eruption of various pressure groups forced to beg and whine for political favors. If there is a sensible reason for contaminating amateur sports with politics and increasing opportunities for political graft, I would certainly like to know it!
G. BYARD LILLEY
Virginia Beach, Va.

RED HEAD (CONT.)
Sir:
Usually the great American halftime show is unable to compete with the habitual retreat to the kitchen during a basketball game, but a precedent was set a few weeks ago. Before all of America seven truly dedicated Red Heads made a television debut as they dazzled the audience with their tricks, not unlike the Harlem Globetrotters in talent and showmanship.

The article in SPORTS ILLUSTRATED is one tribute to the Red Heads (All Red, So Help Them Henna, May 6), who obviously deserve more recognition and praise than has been given them. Because of your story, which was well written and informative, maybe more people will be aware of them. I hope this professional team receives the support it deserves.
JOAN CLAUSS
Cheshire, Conn.

Sir:
Having played against the All-American Red Heads twice, I read your article with enthusiasm. I was disappointed to learn, however, that the best women's basketball team in North America, as a whole, makes only $40,000 a year. Of course, a monetary value cannot be placed on all the fun "Christmas Days" they have. All professional athletes should read this article.
G. CURTIS AKARD
Blountville, Tenn.

Sir:
Orwell Moore's splendid female athletes may have dyed their hair red, but no disguise can cover up the authoritarian and sexist attitudes rooted in the team's owner. Moore seems to regard his players as dehumanized automatons whose freedom of choice must be limited to performing on the basketball court but who are otherwise unfit to be treated as adults. His comment that he "takes a beer myself from time to time but the Red Heads are not to drink" makes Moore sound like one of the hypocrites with a double standard. Moreover, Moore's remarks that the women love basketball so much that they don't care how much they get paid reflects a patronizing attitude.
LOU GERBER
Washington

Sir:
I can't help but feel that the authors have grossly underestimated the talents of women basketball players if they believe, as stated in the article, that the Red Heads are the best basketball team in North America. The best teams compete each year in the AAU National Championships. From this tournament is chosen the All-America team which is now training for an upcoming series with Russia and planning for the next Olympics. I believe the authors must consider the type of competition that the Red Heads meet before they can say that they are the best team. Any of the top AAU teams would look like world champs playing what the authors described as men "gasping like beached fish" or men having' 'soft paunches and fat arms." The AAU teams have had years of experience playing against the best teams in the U.S. as well as touring teams like Russia and the Republic of China. I suggest the authors attend the next AAU National Tournament in March to watch the best basketball teams in North America.
DONNA PRINDLE
Downey, Calif.

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