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An International incident
Pat Putnam
July 22, 1974
Victory for the United States' Delmonica Hanover in trotting's richest race was made far easier by the abrupt fall of the French pretender
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July 22, 1974

An International Incident

Victory for the United States' Delmonica Hanover in trotting's richest race was made far easier by the abrupt fall of the French pretender

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"I can't," Arthur yelled back. "Move up and I'll pull in behind you."

Chapman did push ahead, but Keystone Gary went with him, leaving Savoir still on the outside and eventually out of contention. "After that, I had to hold back on Delmonica," said Chapman. "She was rank. I really had ahold of her."

Coming out of the last turn Delmonica swung away from the rail and Keystone Gary tried to burst through on the inside, only to see Chapman recover and adeptly close that route to the lead. Undaunted, Wellwood guided the unused Keystone Gary to the outside between Delmonica and the Italian horse, Dos-son, who had moved into contention. But by then it was too late for Keystone Gary, who finished second half a length back. "That Chapman had power steering out there," said Wellwood. "He wasn't opening any doors."

For Delmonica, who won in 2:34[4/5], the victory was worth $100,000, bringing her 1974 total to $215,118. "Isn't she beautiful?" said Del Miller. "And I saw the whole race."

Miller's wife Mary Lib explained: "What he means is that he had to stand up to watch the race in Paris and he couldn't see all of it."

"Yeah, the French are great," said Miller. "They give you everything. They gave me dinners, they gave me honors, they gave me medals. But they wouldn't give me a seat for the race. They said it was every man for himself."

Dressing quickly, Mascle, whose Axius finished fourth, sought out Miller at his table. With him came an interpreter. "In Paris I said you were lucky to win," Mascle said. "But no, now I don't think so. Tonight you were not lucky. There is no way I could beat your horse."

They shook hands and the Frenchman left. As Mascle made his way through the crowd, Miller watched him. "That man has a lot of class," he said.

Far away in the press box, Jean Riaud was being cornered by a reporter who asked what had happened to Amyot.

"He broke his leg," Riaud said. "He almost fell." To demonstrate Riaud jack-knifed his right leg and acted as though he was falling.

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