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AND THEN THINGS WERE PUTT IN ORDER
Barry McDermott
July 29, 1974
The leaders in the Women's Open were bumbling around until Sandra Haynie settled matters with two late decisive strokes
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July 29, 1974

And Then Things Were Putt In Order

The leaders in the Women's Open were bumbling around until Sandra Haynie settled matters with two late decisive strokes

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Trailing her by one stroke were earner, who had been sleeping 10 hours a night and shooting a 72 and a 71 during daylight; Sandra Spuzich, who shot a 72 Saturday to tongue-tie the gallery ("It's Spewz-itch, not Sputnik") and Haynie. The word was that Haynie was playing superb golf but up to that point, anyway, was not having any luck with her putter.

And then came Mann, disappointed but not defused. George Blanda, taking a respite from the pro football picket line, walked by and said: "You can shoot a 68 tomorrow."

"That's right, George," answered Mann. "You've seen me do it."

But never on Sunday. The best she could manage was a 75. The crowd for the final round was large enough but mostly silent out of respect for the succession of mini-tragedies that were reeled off in front of them during the afternoon. Carner collected a 77 and finished two strokes back, a tiring Jessen ended with an 81 and Spuzich sputniked all the way to 82. It was as if the U.S. Women's Open was boycotting the players—all but Sandra Haynie, who shot a 75 for a mighty $6,073 and that silver cup.

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