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STRANGERS IN PARADISE
Mark Mulvoy
August 26, 1974
The front-running Red Sox have put all New England on Elysian pins and needles, but they are so venturesome, so different from their predecessors, that they seem to be men from another league
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August 26, 1974

Strangers In Paradise

The front-running Red Sox have put all New England on Elysian pins and needles, but they are so venturesome, so different from their predecessors, that they seem to be men from another league

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Yawkey invited the injured Fisk to join him in his private box for the first game of the Minnesota series on Friday night. "Human beings are the most important things in life," Yawkey said. "I like to know the character of my guys, and the only way to do that is by talking to them. Like when I introduced myself to young Blackwell. We talked for 20 minutes, and afterward I told Darrell that Blackwell is one of those 21-year-old kids who acts 27, not 17."

More than 33,000 New Englanders watched the game with Yawkey and Fisk. The Sox lead the American League with an attendance of nearly 1.1 million, and to this game, as to all games played in Fenway, the people came in all sizes and all shapes, wearing everything and (almost) nothing, arriving by chartered bus from Montpelier, Vt., by subway from Charlestown and by car from Marblehead. The high school and college kids came with their girl friends and sat in the bleachers, sipping the beer they had smuggled in. The crowd cheered Marichal when he walked to the bullpen for his pregame warmup and they cheered him when he ran to the mound to start the game. They cheered Bob Veale when he came on in relief to strike out Rod Carew and Tony Oliva. They cheered Burleson when he initiated two fine double plays. And they cheered Juan Beniquez when he singled home the winning run with the bases loaded in the bottom of the ninth inning.

Oh yes, they booed Yastrzemski when he struck out in his first two at bats.

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