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SPEED WITH STYLE
Peter Revson
September 23, 1974
After 14 years as a racing driver, Peter Revson was near the top—handsome, rich, a winner. And then came the spring of 1974
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September 23, 1974

Speed With Style

After 14 years as a racing driver, Peter Revson was near the top—handsome, rich, a winner. And then came the spring of 1974

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?Of every six people employed in this country, one is involved in some way with the automobile.

?Racing is the second-largest spectator sport in the nation.

? General Motors' annual sales are about equal to the gross national product of Belgium.

The fans sense something even beyond that—they seem to recognize the symbolic importance of the Grand Prix driver. He is engaged, they are aware, in a quixotic pursuit.

This is the life that Peter Jeffrey Revlon Revson lives, and the fans understand it. They figure that the lawyer and the quarterback are dinosaurs. Adapt or die. The young are at the racetrack because they are convinced that the drivers have outslicked the drop-back-and-pass wizards at the Coliseum and Shea, who were fine for a slower, more rudimentary age. But now it is style. Speed and style.

There is this about the young: they may be brash and they may be impatient, but they know a great deal about the tempo of their lives.

REVSON: Sometimes racing becomes so much of a job, sometimes I become so preoccupied with what I've set as my goals in racing, that I don't take time—especially not when I'm in a race car—to sense the exhilaration that racing can bring. For example, you're annoyed by the crowds in the pits, the people who want to see you. You just wish to hell they'd get out of your way. And other drivers: you know they're being sociable but you also know that they're only being superficially pleasant in order to find out what you're doing with your car so they can glean some information that will help them.

But when a new season starts and you've been away from the crowds and the race-car noises and the other drivers for three months, you realize that they are things you relish. You've missed them.

Now the 1974 season is starting and the noise of the cars sounds good. It gets the adrenalin going. I'm happy to see the familiar faces. They belong to people who are interested in doing what I'm doing. As for the other drivers, what the hell; there's nobody else you can talk to about what you're doing.

And there are new competitors. I think the turnover now is due to the younger and better talent coming along and pushing some of the older guys out. I don't want to be one of the older guys who has been pushed out.

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