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Almost Never on Sunday
George A. Gipe
October 28, 1974
In the early days of pro baseball, playing—or even watching—a game on the Sabbath was as reprehensible as calling a woman's limb a leg
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October 28, 1974

Almost Never On Sunday

In the early days of pro baseball, playing—or even watching—a game on the Sabbath was as reprehensible as calling a woman's limb a leg

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The following season, as city councils and state legislatures across the nation debated the issue, attacks on the moral leprosy were stepped up. a climax of sorts being reached on May 24, 1891 during a game between Cincinnati and Philadelphia. The Cincinnati Chief of Police marched onto the field with 60 officers, arrested the whole team and carted the players off to the station, where they were fined a total of $5,400.

A happier story would end right here, with virtue triumphant. But as everyone knows, the disease of Sunday baseball, after a brief remission, succeeded in ravaging every major city in the nation. By the end of World War I, half a dozen cities had succumbed, and total disintegration had clearly set in by 1924, when Brooklyn opened its season not only on a Sunday, but on Easter Sunday.

As more than one minister warned before the turn of the century, America has not been the same since.

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