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19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
October 28, 1974
JUST PLAIN BILLSir: Pat Putnam's article on Bill Walton (That's No Way to Talk to Teacher, Oct. 14), was unfair. It sounded as though Putnam actually expected Walton would be able to overpower Kareem Abdul-Jabbar.
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October 28, 1974

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

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To the average American, Wilt is an egotistical recalcitrant who has never realized his full potential, but if this is true, the above are obvious reasons. Wilt is the product of Watergate mentalities and a bad press, for he is a man of sacrifice. It is America that refuses to recognize his full accomplishments. SPORTS ILLUSTRATED is to be commended for printing the personal opinions of a much-maligned man.
LEROY K. JOHNSON
Captain, USAF
Minot Air Force Base, N.Dak.

STANDING PAT
Sir:
I can't help detecting a trace of levity in Dan Jenkins' article (A Patriotic Shout, Oct. 14) on the New England Patriots. Is this intentional? Does Mr. Jenkins still deny that the Pats are for real?

In the game today you rarely find a team with that good old Boomer Sooner spirit. The only thing that many players get enthusiastic over is their paycheck. It's about time some spirit was instilled into the pros. My advice to Mr. Jenkins is to give credit and respect where they are due. The Pats are a team to be reckoned with.
ROBERT MCELROY
Worcester, Mass.

Sir:
Perhaps the intellectuals "sitting around Harvard Square" are now starting to look up from their "Sanskrit" and "waterpipes," but we looked up a month ago. We know who Jim Plunkett and Chuck Fairbanks are. So on Sundays books and Smithies are cast aside so that we may witness the Patriots' triumphant ride.
D. FULTON, D. HENDEL, D. MITCHELL,
R. NORMAN, D. SELBY
Amherst, Mass.

UNFAIR HARVARD
Sir:
In answer to your question, "Whatever happened to McGill?" in the SCORECARD item (Oct. 7) on Harvard's football centenary, let me tell you McGill is doing fine. The Redmen were undefeated in Quebec last year, beat the western Canadian champions and lost their only game in the College Bowl, Canada's national college championship.

This year all the teams in the Canadian Intercollegiate Athletic Union are wearing "100" on their helmets to commemorate the centennial of football in North America. On Oct. 5 at the game against the University of Toronto the halftime show was a replay of the Harvard-McGill game of 1874.
EGAN CHAMBERS
Montreal

Sir:
I read with great interest your report that Harvard now claims to have played the first football game. This assertion raises several questions which Mr. Cohane and the Harvard Football News might not like to answer.

First, where was Harvard last year when the NCAA held its football centennial celebration? Next, one might wonder where Harvard was in 1969, when Princeton and Rutgers played their centennial contest. I find it hard to believe that Mr. Cohane has spent five years researching this "amazing" discovery. Instead, I have an alternate thesis. Could the announcement possibly be the beginning of an insidious plot by the Cantabs to claim every first in the record book? Just think how much fun it would be to see Harvard after every entry. Better than that, you could simply condense the record book to one sentence on one page. It would read, " Harvard, first to do everything."
KENNETH I. MOCH, '76
Princeton, N.J.

PAROLED
Sir:
The Criminals, the varsity football team of Yuma High School, have been written about in SPORTS ILLUSTRATED because of their name and, more recently, their extended losing streak.

The streak is over! At El Centro, Calif. the Crims beat EC 20-0. This was the first varsity win in 49 attempts.

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