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19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
December 09, 1974
WRIGHT OR WRONG? Sir: Steve Wright's article about his two seasons with the Giants (Wright Was All Wrong, Right? Nov. 25) was a true-to-life example of the behind-the-scenes operations described in Pete Gent's North Dallas Forty. For many years (10, to be exact) I have wondered why standout players with other clubs who have been traded to the Giants never equaled their past performances. Wright has given me a little insight into what some of the problems may be. His article was terrific reading.ALAN MANDELLLittle Neck, N.Y.
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December 09, 1974

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

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NOMINATIONS (CONT.)
Sir:
I nominate Gordie Howe for Sportsman of the Year. At 46, Howe is in the second season of his hockey comeback, which thus far has been nothing short of brilliant, especially his magnificent performance against the U.S.S.R. I wonder where Phil Esposito, Bobby Orr, Rick MacLeish and Bobby Clarke will be when they reach that age.
DREW SNIDER
West Vancouver, British Columbia

Sir:
Dr. J.
JOHN MICHAEL SCOTT
Greensboro, N.C.

Sir:
Eddy Merckx.
KENTON STOREY
Haslett, Mich.

Sir:
Laffit Pincay.
ISRAEL GOODMAN
Louisville

Sir:
What better qualification than to be the best in the world in a sport that is played in more than 120 countries. Johan Cruyff.
DAVID KING
Buffalo

Sir:
I nominate a soccer player who has broken many of the immortal Pel�'s records in World Cup action and who scored the deciding goal in more than 20 of his country's World Cup games, including this year's 2-1 final against Holland—Mr. Clutch, Der Bomber, Gerd M�ller of West Germany.
PATRICK FISHER
Houston

SHOO-FLY PIE
Sir:
Your item "Gut Check" in SCORECARD of the Sept. 23 issue was of special interest to me. From 1930 through 1934 I was in the Maine woods nearly every day, winter and summer, working, hunting or fishing. During those years I was in many of the wilderness places from the Penobscot River east to New Brunswick.

To a woodsman the word "flies" can include blackflies, deerflies, moose flies, mosquitoes and midges, the punkie, no-see-ums or little hot feet of the Northern Indians. Stewart Edward White devoted an entire chapter to flies in his book The Forest (1904). And he had much firsthand experience as he explored and fished the wilderness of northern Ontario all the way to Hudson Bay.

While using both hands to land a fighting fish, I have had blackflies bite where the hat brim touched my forehead until blood ran down my face. But the blackfly holds still to be killed. He works the daylight shift; the mosquito operates around the clock. My experience with flies agrees with Dr. Ivan Mc-Daniel's findings: every man must experiment until he finds the repellent that works best for him, from the thickest paste to the oils and modern sprays.

The early woodsman, timber cruiser or lumberjack made his own fly repellent from pine tar and lard, for a very good reason. The lard was readily available from the cook at the lumber camp, and the pine tar came from the blacksmith's, where it was used to heal the cuts and scrapes on the horses. Each man could make the repellent to his individual taste—too little tar would not ward off the flies, too much burned the skin. It is a nasty mess and has been called many vile names by those who use it or eschew it. But it has a redeeming feature. Pine tar reduces much of the poison sting of the inevitable bites.

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