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No slowdown in Detroit
Pat Putnam
January 20, 1975
The Pistons have the lead in the NBA's toughest division but they can't afford a recession with the Bulls, Kings and Bucks right behind
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January 20, 1975

No Slowdown In Detroit

The Pistons have the lead in the NBA's toughest division but they can't afford a recession with the Bulls, Kings and Bucks right behind

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For last week's games with Detroit, Costello went to Gary Brokaw, the speedy rookie from Notre Dame, and he responded with 22 points in the opener. Abdul-Jabbar had 23, Dandridge 32 and Guard Jim Price 20. In Game Two, Brokaw started again, scored six quick points and injured his hip. After that, the Bucks were never really in it, although the Pistons had lost Bing with an ankle injury late in the first period.

Dandridge was furious after the loss. "There's something badly wrong with this team," he said. "We're not hungry enough. We go out there and sometimes we play like dogs. We're trying to set up plays and we should be running. We're going to have trouble beating anybody unless we start running as soon as we set a foot on the court."

In the Piston dressing room, Lanier was content. After the first game, a Detroit paper said that the Bucks had shown the Pistons who was "boss." The big center had been less than happy with the story.

A man came in and clapped Lanier on the shoulder. "Hey, Bob, what happened to the boss?"

"I don't know anything about bosses," said Lanier, who had just scored 29 points. He grinned broadly. "I just know who won the game."

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