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THAT OLD GANG OF MINE
Leo Durocher
April 07, 1975
In 1934 the Gas House Gang came clawing out of St. Louis to seize a pennant and the World Series. Lending a fast glove and faster lip was a cocky shortstop
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April 07, 1975

That Old Gang Of Mine

In 1934 the Gas House Gang came clawing out of St. Louis to seize a pennant and the World Series. Lending a fast glove and faster lip was a cocky shortstop

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Landis looks at Medwick and says, " Mr. Medwick, did you take a punch at Mr. Owen?"

Joe Medwick and I were roommates, and I never heard him tell a lie in his life. "Yes, sir," Joe said.

Landis looked at Owen. "And did you try to step on Joe Medwick?"

And Marv Owen said, "No, sir."

Landis just kept looking at him. After a long silence he turned to Medwick with a look that I had seen often. A very kind, almost affectionate look. "For your own good, son," he said, "I think I'll have to remove you from the game. You might get hurt. And we do have to continue the ball game."

And, do you know, Frisch raised up about six feet and told the commissioner that he would not take Medwick out. "I am the manager of the St. Louis baseball team," he said, "and I say who plays and who doesn't play." If Judge Landis ordered Klem to throw Medwick out of the game, he said, then there was nothing he could do about it. "But I will not take him out myself."

In the same quiet, gentle way, Landis told him, "Now you will take him out. You will take him out. You will do as I direct you, Mr. Frisch. You will take him out."

Judge Landis was right. There was nothing else to do. If Medwick had stayed in the game, there would have been a riot in that park. The only thing Joe was disappointed about was that he had been having such a great Series that he only needed one more hit to tie Pepper Martin's 1931 record of 12. Chick Fullis, who went in to replace him, came up in the eighth inning and got a hit. As it was, Martin, in my book the man with the greatest World Series record of all time, had 11 hits, too.

In that final game I had two hits myself. In addition to the single in the big seven-run inning I hit the fence in right center for a triple and scored our 10th run.

By that time all we were really trying to do was preserve Dizzy Dean's shutout. And, do you know, Diz was still so charged up that he almost blew it himself in the ninth. With Gehringer on first base, Goose Goslin hit a perfect double-play ball to Rip Collins at first. Rip speared it moving to his right, threw the ball to me and raced back to cover first base. I whipped the ball to Rip, but Diz, who had come charging off the mound as soon as the ball was hit, cut right in front of him and took it away from him. What a beautiful double play! What a great fielding pitcher! The only trouble was that the umpire was signaling safe. Rip's foot had been on the bag and Diz's foot had been on top of Rip's.

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