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NET RESULT: A CAPITAL GAME
Bil Gilbert
June 02, 1975
Allie Ritzenberg is the top-ranked pro "in town"—that portion of Washington, D.C. inhabited by tennis-playing movers and shakers
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June 02, 1975

Net Result: A Capital Game

Allie Ritzenberg is the top-ranked pro "in town"—that portion of Washington, D.C. inhabited by tennis-playing movers and shakers

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"Bob was so punctual, took his tennis so seriously, that even before we heard anything about it we knew something big was happening during the Cuban Missile Crisis period," Ritzenberg says. "Bob missed one morning, but he was decent about it; he sent his driver to say he was tied up. When he came back and started playing again, nothing was said, but I figured things were settled."

In somewhat the same way, Joan Kennedy's tennis pro knew about her pregnancy long before the professional gossips because the Senator's wife called to ask that her lesson schedule be changed to later in the day and to explain that it was not for frivolous reasons.

Ritzenberg goes on: "The first time I met Mary, she said, 'If you are as good as you are supposed to be, why do you charge so little?' "

"Mary who?"

"Mary Lindsay. This has always been a first-name place. It is just not a situation in which anybody pulls rank, I suppose because there is usually so much rank standing around."

"What did you tell Mary when she said you were underpriced?"

"I thought she had a good point. I raised my rates." (They are now $30 a lesson.)

"Who's the best woman player in your—how would you put it?—celebrity squad?"

"Maybe Joan, but a lot of the girls are frightened by Ethel because she has such a reputation for being competitive."

"What about the men?"

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