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19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
Edited by Gay Flood
August 18, 1975
THE REDS' STREAKSir:I have been a Cincinnati Reds' fan for many years and I can't remember a team as exciting as this one (Cincy Doesn't Kid Around, Aug. 4). Power, speed, defense and excellent pitching, from starters to relievers, have given the Reds the best won-lost record in the majors. Now, after the Reds' May-July streak, we Cincinnati fans anxiously await the playoffs and the World Series. The Big Red Machine is in high gear. KENNETH SMITH Cincinnati
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August 18, 1975

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

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BOOG'S BATTING AVERAGE
Sir:
As I recall, in your April 7 scouting report on the Cleveland Indians you said it would be nice if Boog Powell could manage to hit better than his weight (250). Well, he was hitting .301 as of Aug. 1, with 16 home runs and 52 RBIs. I just thought I'd let you know.
MARC ZATORSKY
North Lauderdale, Fla.

CALIFORNIA'S GAME
Sir:
Another fine attempt has been made to figure out us Southern Californians and the games we play (They've Stepped Way Over the Line, Aug. 4). Curry Kirkpatrick wrote a warm and thought-provoking article on the game of Over the Line and its resulting insanity. But at least he pointed out how serious the teams are. It is not a joke to those who come from all over the country to compete in this invigorating tournament.
RICHARD A. HOFF
Escondido, Calif.

Sir:
Royal Clarke, Mr. Over the Line at the ripe old age of 40, is given credit as a co-inventor, whereas he should be called a resurrector of the game. I was introduced to Over the Line and Hit Through the Infield on the playground of Horace Mann Jr. High School ( Los Angeles) in the summer of 1932. My arithmetic says this was three years before Mr. Clarke was born. The numerous ball-playing alumni of Horace Mann who got their start in the game some 20 years before Mr. Clarke's "invention" must shudder at the total absence of this fact.

Miss Emerson was nice, though.
JACK E. SMITH
Sacramento

Sir:
In Los Angeles during the 1930s, Over the Line was our mainstay throughout the summer. Royal Clarke apparently eliminated the baserunning. In my era the batter got as many bases as he could reach before the fielding team returned the ball over the line.

The elimination of running is a doubtful improvement, but the addition of Miss Emerson is a grand slam.
R. W. HEGGLAND
Houston

OKLAHOMA STRAYS
Sir:
How can you lose two elephants, especially in Oklahoma (The Great American Elephant Hunt, Aug. 4)? We Okies know that our state is not all flat prairie land. Around Hugo some areas are so thick they make the jungles of Africa look like the cornfields of Nebraska. That is the reason the elephants eluded searchers for nearly three weeks. Jeannette Bruce did a terrific job of describing this unique occurrence. Isa and Lilly were finally captured (SCORECARD, Aug. 11), but those who searched so long must remember the area for its thickets.
GREG DORRIS
Stigler, Okla.

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