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MIDWEST: Where coaches go gray
Pat Putnam
October 27, 1975
When you subtract Kareem Abdul-Jabbar and Dave Bing from the Milwaukee Bucks and Detroit Pistons, respectively, add still another year onto the collective age of the venerable Chicago Bulls and consider the young and brash Kansas City Kings—well, this division ain't what it used to be. But it should be more interesting, if only to unemployed coaches out there keeping track of possible job openings. At Milwaukee, Larry Costello has to prove he can win without the big guy, a less than enviable task, although it is not true that the Bucks will play their home games on the Little Bighorn. Last year was supposed to be Chicago's, but wasn't; Dick Motta will try again with the same old Bulls minus Chet Walker (probably)—and now you know why Motta bought a gas station. At Detroit, Ray Scott exchanged Bing for Washington's Kevin Porter, which brought peace to the Pistons; if Scott could trade some of that calm for two forwards his future would be less bleak.
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October 27, 1975

Midwest: Where Coaches Go Gray

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That's the problem: after Lanier there aren't many people in Detroit that Porter can deal off the ball to. Last year, when they stumbled to a 40-42 record, the Pistons' scoring came from Lanier inside and Bing outside, and not much from anybody else. Meanwhile, Porter was leading the league in assists serving up the ball to Phil Chenier, Wes Unseld, Elvin Hayes and Mike Riordan. For Porter to even come close to his assist mark of last season, Lanier will have to break every scoring record known to man.

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