SI Vault
 
EASY AS ONE TWO SKI
November 17, 1975
The fun began falling out of skiing about the time the first expert proclaimed that it was supposed to be a stylish sport, done just precisely so, and for years students suffered the tyranny of one slavish technique or another. Then came Interski, a teaching congress, and to the rescue came the U.S. demonstration team, 10 easy riders showing off the wide-stance, hang-loose style that promises to revitalize the sport around the winter world. The key moves in this new mode are captured by Don Moss, who painted it while learning it
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November 17, 1975

Easy As One Two Ski

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The fun began falling out of skiing about the time the first expert proclaimed that it was supposed to be a stylish sport, done just precisely so, and for years students suffered the tyranny of one slavish technique or another. Then came Interski, a teaching congress, and to the rescue came the U.S. demonstration team, 10 easy riders showing off the wide-stance, hang-loose style that promises to revitalize the sport around the winter world. The key moves in this new mode are captured by Don Moss, who painted it while learning it

Relax and take the hill as it comes: each ski stance is correct (above), depending on the terrain. In the basic Christie (right), you steer in, legs apart, and then skid out.

Picking up the pace (below), you apply independent leg action for better edge control, coming off a faster turn by stepping out of it and holding balance by shifting weight.

In full attack (left), both skiers stick to wide stance, the man behind balanced on both skis, the one ahead weighting his downhill ski only. Both styles are correct. In the short-radius turn (below), facing downhill eliminates the need for shoulder rotation.

Secret of moguls? It's all in the knees, as shown by the entire team on the next pages. From left: Jens Husted, Scooter LaCouter, Jim Hinman, Jerry Warren, Steve Br�tt, Bill Duddy, Paul Jones, Mike Porter, Chris Ryman and Bruce Bowlin, who represent a cross section of American ski areas.

Borrowing a touch from another sport, the hockey stop (left) entails an easy down-and-side-thrust move. Running slalom gates (right) brings it all together: face downhill, shift weight, keep feet apart—and don't worry about style.

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