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REMEMBER, THIS IS LEAP YEAR
Pat Putnam
February 09, 1976
Tom Woods was the class of a classy field at New York's Millrose Games
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February 09, 1976

Remember, This Is Leap Year

Tom Woods was the class of a classy field at New York's Millrose Games

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"People say they don't know how he does it, but look at him," said Woods, gazing at Livers, who is 5'8�". "Look at his center mass, which is what you have to lift. He has such long legs, his center mass is only an inch below mine and Stones'. The mystery is a lot of bull."

Up went the bar to 7'4�". On his second attempt, Woods flopped over, leaving the bar rocking but in place. Livers was the first to go out. Under the circumstances, he had done extraordinarily well. The only contestant to begin his approach from the left, the quiet little man from Norristown, Pa., also a world-class triple jumper, was forced to begin his approach from the top of the banked track. His first three steps were downhill.

Kotinek was the next to go out. Then Stones failed. "Losing won't get me bent out of shape," he said. "I know what kind of shape I'm not in. But I do want to go for the same height at the L.A. Times meet next week. That would be a collegiate indoor record [ Woods has passed up his collegiate eligibility] and I'm kind of hot on records. I like to get my name in the book as often as possible. After that I want to win the NCAAs indoors and outdoors, then the gold medal. That will be about everything."

Woods had the officials raise the bar to 7'6", a quarter of an inch beyond Stones' indoor world record. On his first two jumps he barely missed; his third was a wipeout. It was 1:12 a.m.

"Wow, that was too close," said Stones. "He just missed those first two. I've got to move that record up some. But if he had broken it, I had made up my mind to be the first to shake his hand."

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