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19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
July 19, 1976
MONTREAL MARCHSir:Apparently Jerry Kirshenbaum (Good Times by the Cut-ups, June 28) missed some great performances while covering the U.S. Swimming Trials in Long Beach. While reporting that the American women "looked as if they were in shock" in the wake of the East German Trials, he neglected to even mention some notable occurrences—like an American record in the 200 back by Maryanne Graham and another American record in the 200 fly by 1972 gold medalist Karen Thornton.
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July 19, 1976

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

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THE FARCE
Sir:
I love two things about equally in this world, my country and Muhammad Ali. The Bicentennial reinforced the love for my country, but the Ali-Inoki so-called fight (...But Only a Farce in Tokyo, July 5) did little for my admiration of the world's heavyweight boxing champion.
WENDY LAMOUR
Houston

Sir:
Before everyone screams in outrage over the recent Ali-Inoki "match," look at the two things that were proved in the bout.

1. It is senseless to attempt such showdowns—both fighters followed the rules of their games, and hardly ever came in contact.

2. Ali is certainly the master showman of our era. I paid my $10 and had an enjoyable evening, although the fight wasn't quite what I expected. Some of the best action was the fans leaving the arena.

Long live P.T. Barnum!
EUGENE F. MCCOLGAN
St. Petersburg, Fla.

Sir:
Too bad the match wasn't as good as your article.
MICHAEL KINGOFF
Wilmington, N.C.

HANDICAPPERS
Sir:
I would like to commend Bill Leggett for his fine article All That Glitters Is Not Gold (June 28). Horse racing goes far, far beyond the Triple Crown and deserves much more recognition throughout the year. Great horses like Master Derby, Royal Glint and Ancient Title should be written about more often. After the Honest Pleasures are finished in June, it's the handicappers that roll on.
JAMES SCUILLI
Pittsburgh

MA BELL
Sir:
It was with some interest that I read your comment in SCORECARD (June 28) concerning Michigan Bell's offer to sell maize and blue telephones as a status symbol to Wolverine fans. Perhaps they got the idea from my daughter Polly, who in December of 1970, while a senior in high school, was searching for the ideal Christmas gift for me. It's been said that, like Bob Ufer, I too have maize and blue blood flowing through my veins. Polly went to the Michigan Bell offices and asked if they had a maize and blue telephone. Not quite. They had a yellow phone with a yellow cord, but at that time their blue was a very pale tone. They offered to specially paint the phone cradle a darker blue and to attach the yellow handset to it. This they did and they even delivered it to my house the day before Christmas. It's still on my desk and has served as a conversation piece for these past 5� years. Ma Bell is to be congratulated for her insight into status symbols. But that old devil inflation certainly has taken hold. My telephone, specially painted and with four outside lines and an intercom system, cost $26 in 1970. Now you say the cost is $54.95? Anyway, Go Blue!
BLAINE ZIMMERMAN
Monroe, Mich.

BSA IS NOT A VINCENT
Sir:
Please inform Sam Moses (Wind Her Up and Hang On, July 5) that a BSA motorcycle is not a Vincent! This is akin to calling a Ford a Bugatti. Beese Wendt's magnificent Vincent (destroked from 1,000 cc to 750) is a sight to behold—and hear. His continued competitiveness is a tribute to individual persistence and to those design features that make the Vincent, despite being out of production for 21 years, the world's greatest motorcycle.
PAUL G. ROCHMIS
Annandale, Va.

PATE'S STATE
Sir:
Immediately after reading your article on the U.S. Open (You Were Great, Jerry Pate, June 28), I felt I should let Dan Jenkins know that even though Jerry Pate was born in Georgia, he early on moved here to Pensacola and his home has been here since. I believe this should qualify Jerry as a "lean Floridian" as opposed to the "lean Georgian."

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