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19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
Edited by Gay Flood
October 11, 1976
AS SHE IS SPOKE—AND WRITSir:I concur with Edwin Newman's article (Regulated to the Bench, Sportswise, Sept. 27). Many Europeans believe that we Americans are isolationists because so few of us are bilingual. Obviously we are not isolationists, but one may ask how we can become a nation of bilingual people when so few of us are monolingual. I hope that Newman's book also explores the wealth of grammatical errors and malapropisms in commercial television in general. Newman speaks good like an elocutionist should.ROBERT W. WIRTZMandan, N. Dak.
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October 11, 1976

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

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AS SHE IS SPOKE—AND WRIT
Sir:
I concur with Edwin Newman's article (Regulated to the Bench, Sportswise, Sept. 27). Many Europeans believe that we Americans are isolationists because so few of us are bilingual. Obviously we are not isolationists, but one may ask how we can become a nation of bilingual people when so few of us are monolingual. I hope that Newman's book also explores the wealth of grammatical errors and malapropisms in commercial television in general. Newman speaks good like an elocutionist should.
ROBERT W. WIRTZ
Mandan, N. Dak.

Sir:
You can blame Edwin Newman and the excerpt from his book A Civil Tongue if you get 10 zillion letters calling attention to un-grammatical statements by sportscasters. The supply of material is inexhaustible. Just the stuff from Curt Gowdy is enough for a whole chapter. "Their future appears to be ahead of them," he said of the Baltimore Colts in late November of last year. After a newcomer to the NFL came into a game between Miami and the Denver Broncos in December, Gowdy announced: "He played with the Chicago Fire of the now-extinct World Football League." (Was that the WFL or a stegosaurus?) Gowdy makes Jim Simpson and the others sound almost literate.

Irregardless of all that, A Civil Tongue looks like some kind of book.
JACK HILTON
New Canaan, Conn.

Sir:
Where was the mention of the countless passes thrown "right on the money"? It is enough to make one winch.
ARTHUR P. DARLING, M.D.
Corning, N.Y.

Sir:
Edwin Newman's very good article proves that he has a succinct head on his shoulders.
JOHN M. HARRIS
Coshocton, Ohio

Sir:
Edwin Newman says, "Stadiums are increasingly roofed over." In light of the message of his article, I can only assume that this is opposed to being "roofed under," right?
BRENT LOVERN
Richmond, Va.

Sir:
I was greatly disappointed that Edwin Newman didn't "make mention" of that five-letter word "great," the grease without which the sportscasting industry would grind to a screeching...silence. Whatever happened to such adjectives as "excellent," "tremendous," "healthy," "long," "speedy," or that poor little unassuming adverb "very"?

Between you and I, he might also have referred to the obvious confusion of sportscasters about the correct use of "me" as the object of a preposition.
KEITH DUGAN
Des Plaines, Ill.

Sir:
If Edwin Newman is really among the [1/10] of 1% of the population that speaks perfect English he should have better things to do than write articles making fun of the rest of us. And how many sports fans would like to have missed Dizzy Dean's baseball telecasts when he said, "He'd a been safe if he'd a slud"? I wouldn't have.
JOHN OLSON
Sioux Falls, S. Dak.

SWEET REVENGE
Sir:
In his article on the Ohio State-Penn State game (Out To Make Three People Happy. Sept. 27) Douglas S. Looney stated that Ohio State was "a certified powerhouse that should flick off Missouri." As I recall. Missouri ended up doing the flicking by a 22-21 score.
KRIS COWAN
Fort Wayne, Ind.

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