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19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
Edited by Gay Flood
November 01, 1976
SCRAPPERSSir:I was a bit surprised to see Minnesota Running Back Chuck Foreman on your Oct. 18 cover. Walter Payton, Chicago's own fine back, ran for 141 yards in 19 carries in that contest, while Foreman was held to 63 yards in 23 rushes. Payton is leading the entire NFL in rushing and is the main reason the Bears are not only respectable again but a legitimate threat to Minnesota's dominance of the NFC Central Division. The Bears are scrappers to the end, as your article (Two Games for the Price of One) makes clear.JACK KAPPELMt. Greenwood, Ill.
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November 01, 1976

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

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Sir:
Congratulations to SI and Edwin Shrake for by far the funniest piece of satire I have read in a long time. I just hope the rest of America doesn't think we're all like Grover.
BOB BAKER
Norman, Okla.

Sir:
I'll be dadburned if I didn't get a bigger kick out of that fella Grover's letter than I did out of that football game in Big D. Many more games like that and I suspect them coachers, Swisher and Rogal, might be joining ol' Les and Grover in Terlingua.
B. J. ANDERSON
Gainesville, Fla.

GUILTY UNTIL PROVEN INNOCENT
Sir:
Re the article Nobody Loves the Ruling Class (Oct. 11) by Frank Deford, society's view of officials was succinctly demonstrated to me as I was leaving the field after a junior varsity football game that I had officiated. I was still in uniform when I encountered a woman and her 4-year-old child; they were just getting out of their car and had no idea how the game had come out. As I passed them, the child looked at me and uttered a long, sincere "Boo!" Maybe it's genetic.
F. S. WEBSTER III
Sugar Land, Texas

CHOPPED DOWN TO SIZE
Sir:
I am a medical student and a first-degree black belt in karate. Having devoted six years of hard work to the art, I know the meaning of karate, its positive aspects of physical and mental training and its limitations. I find it difficult to convey to laymen the true meaning of the martial arts and what they can and cannot do. It's also very difficult to differentiate between true, dedicated karate instructors and schools and unqualified ones. Your article Dangerous Delusion (Oct. 18) does this better than any other I have seen on the subject. From now on, I'll refer my friends with questions about the martial arts to your straightforward piece. Thanks for what I consider a real public service.
DAVID SIEGEL
Pittsburgh

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