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SCORECARD
Edited by Robert W. Creamer
November 29, 1976
DOUBLE-BARRELED ARGUMENT
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November 29, 1976

Scorecard

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Pollack's concern for detail is reflected in his 76er yearbook, which is rich in trivia. Examples:

?The most common point spread in the first 12,968 NBA games ever played was two. It occurred 949 times, 128 more than second-place four. The largest spread ever was 63 ( Los Angeles over Golden State, 162-99, in 1972).

?The Pac 8 has supplanted the Big Ten as the leading producer of NBA talent (28 players). California is the No. 1 state (34), UCLA the No. 1 college (12).

? Cleveland had the biggest team last season. The average Cavalier was 6'7.08" and weighed 211.08 pounds. An average Portland Trail Blazer was a runty 6'4.86", an average Houston Rocket a frail 198 pounds.

?The most popular months for NBA birthdays were November and July, with 23 each. June had only 10.

?Last season a total of 682 technical fouls was called, netting the league $37,650 in fines. Boston Coach Tommy Heinsohn led with 33. Chicago's Norm Van Lier topped the players with 23.

?The most popular uniform number was 10. Tied for second were 15 and 42. The onetime leader, 24, slumped to third. Only two players wore 1. Two wore 13. (This season one player, Robert Parish of Golden State, is wearing 00, but that's for next year's book.)

THINKING MAN'S TEAM

Never underestimate the memory of an Original Met fan. No sooner had we mentioned that four members of the 1962 New York Mets, possibly the worst team in big-league history, are currently pitching coaches in the majors (SCORECARD, Nov. 22) than we received indignant word that three other members of that justly maligned team are now passing on their accumulated wisdom to today's players. Catchers Joe Pignatano and Chris Cannizzaro are coaches with the Mets (Joe) and the Atlanta Braves (Chris), and Third Baseman Don Zimmer is manager of the Boston Red Sox.

And if you move onward to the 1963 Mets, who were better—but not much—you can add Catcher Norm Sherry, manager of the California Angels, and Pitcher Larry Bearnarth, who was a coach for the Montreal Expos last season.

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