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19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
Edited by Gay Flood
December 13, 1976
BASKETBALL'S RANK AND FILESir:A college basketball fan living in Indianapolis surely feels at home after reading your Top 20 rankings (Nov. 29). Seven of the first 15 teams are within a five-hour drive of our fair city. Your only error lies in the fact that you failed to locate the No. 1 team one hour south of Indianapolis, in Bloomington, instead of five hours north, in Ann Arbor, Mich. ROBERT C. HOAGLAND Indianapolis
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December 13, 1976

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

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BASKETBALL'S RANK AND FILE
Sir:
A college basketball fan living in Indianapolis surely feels at home after reading your Top 20 rankings (Nov. 29). Seven of the first 15 teams are within a five-hour drive of our fair city. Your only error lies in the fact that you failed to locate the No. 1 team one hour south of Indianapolis, in Bloomington, instead of five hours north, in Ann Arbor, Mich.
ROBERT C. HOAGLAND
Indianapolis

Sir:
How could you possibly rank Indiana 13th, among such unknowns as DePaul, Washington State and Georgetown? Kent Benson will dominate college basketball.
SCOTT DURHAM
Mount Vernon, Ind.

Sir:
You really blew it this time. Ranking Marquette No. 8 can only prove an embarrassment to SI.
MIKE CORON
Watertown, Wis.

Sir:
Need I remind you that at the beginning of the 1971-72 and 1974-75 seasons you had the UCLA Bruins No. 4 in the nation, as you have done this year, and that in both cases UCLA ended up as NCAA champion?
A. JAMES HUMPHREYS
Redmond, Wash.

Sir:
You neglected to include Alabama. The Tide is making waves this season.
FRED ASHE
Purdue, Ind.

Sir:
How could you leave out Notre Dame?
JEFF FORD
Albuquerque

HOCKEY'S PROBLEMS
Sir:
My sincere thanks to Peter Gammons for telling it like it is in professional hockey (A Matter of Dollars and Sense, Nov. 29)—not that hockey enthusiasts aren't aware of the overpriced tickets, the overpaid players and the boring games. It's just nice to see that the NHL Board of Governors is finally going to try to deal with the situation and, I hope, make the necessary changes. Now if only the other major sports bodies would do the same.
RICHARD DOHERTY
Lynn, Mass.

Sir:
It is ironic that National Hockey League executives now admit a need for rivalries. But more than rivalries, the NHL needs equality within its divisions. Why not drop the albatross of geographical grouping (it barely exists under the current structure anyway) and adopt a four-tiered system similar to that used in European soccer leagues? Put the four or five best teams in Division I, the next-best clubs in Division II and so forth. Design the schedule so that teams play their divisional rivals more often than the other teams. At the end of the year, the bottom team in each division would be replaced by the top team in the division below it.

As for the playoffs, there is no viable reason why more than eight teams—the division champions plus the next four leaders on points—should play for the Stanley Cup.
JOHN JAY WILHEIM
Cranbury, N.J.

Sir:
Your article states that a man was "shot to death in the Olympia parking lot after a tennis match two weeks ago." The fact is that following a tennis match at Olympia Stadium a man was shot to death in a parking lot near Olympia, but the lot was in no way owned, operated or controlled by Olympia Stadium.

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