SI Vault
 
19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
Edited by Gay Flood
February 14, 1977
DANDY DONSSir: Barry McDermott's article (The Streaks of San Francisco, Jan. 31) was refreshing and inspiring. Too often college athletes are scorned for being immature. Coaches and spectators have a tendency to forget that what they are dealing with is oversized teen-agers who just happen to excel in sports. Forward James Hardy said it best: "People forget I'm still a kid in a man's body."
Decrease font Decrease font
Enlarge font Enlarge font
February 14, 1977

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

View CoverRead All Articles View This Issue
1 2 3

VASSS advocates are to be congratulated on having surmounted the formidable opposition of tradition in correcting a glaring, century-old weakness in the great game of tennis. The no-ad game with the nine-point tie breaker means that tournament matches can be put on within sensible time limits, which not only tightens the drama for spectators and players, but also makes life easier for all of us tournament directors.

I firmly believe that the nine-point tie breaker is the best of the tie-breaker methods. It is certainly more easily understood by the layman than any other and is packed with tension.
REX V. DARLING
Palm Springs, Calif.

MAGIC NUMBER
Sir:
Steve Dyal's letter (Jan. 31) noted that quarterbacks wearing No. 12 were winners in the Super Bowl. He failed to mention Super Bowl III, played on Jan. 12, 1969, in which Joe Namath, wearing No. 12, led the Jets to a 16-7 win over the Colts.
JOHN POKREFKE
St. Louis

TOUCH OF SPRING
Sir:
Dan Jenkins' article on the Bing Crosby National Pro-Am was like a breath of spring (Watson, but Not So Elementary, Jan. 31). Bing's clambake always seems to have the right mixture of golf, scenery and celebrities. The sight of Pebble Beach is an inspiration to all of us golfers in the frozen East. At least we know that snow does not cover the fairways and greens everywhere.
JAMES WALTER
Lexington, Va.

REAL COWBOY
Sir:
I hope your readers have not been led to believe that all cowboys are like the hypothetical one you described in your article The Marlboro Man (Jan. 17). Being a Western cowgirl and ranch wife, I can't help resenting your portrayal of a "real cowboy" as a gambler, boozer and chauvinist who is lazy and chews snuff. I can name a dozen real cowboys who do not fit that description, and they don't insult their wives, either. One in particular is my brother, Bert Oliver of Santa Ynez, Calif., who doesn't drink, smoke, chew or cuss—much. Furthermore, he's a whole lot better looking.
SANDY WILLIAMS
Norwood, Colo.

Sir:
Although I don't smoke Darrell Winfield's cigarette (I smoke Winstons), I really admire him for apparently keeping his head screwed on straight and having a firm grip on his roots. He is quite a man. But aside from all that, just what does a feature article on a fine cowpoke and gentleman have to do with the world of sport?
BRENT McWHORTER
Prescott, Ariz.

ON TOLEDO!
Sir:
With reference to your item on "the old hometown" in SCORECARD (Jan. 24), Toledo, Ohio is usually thought of for these two things: the Glass Capital of the World and the home of Toledo University, recent conqueror in basketball of Indiana and South Carolina.
DAVID D. SCOTT
Newport Beach, Calif.

Sir:
There's yet another song that Toledo is famous for, one much older than Jones Junior High, which was pre-World War II vintage. It is called We're Strong for Toledo and it goes like this:

We're strong for Toledo,
T-O-L-E-D-O.
The girls are the fairest,
The boys are the squarest
Of any old town that I know.

We're strong for Toledo,
The place where the breezes blow.
In any old weather,
We'll all stick together
In T-O-L-E-D-O.
JIM SNEDECOR
New York City

1 2 3