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19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
Edited by Gay Flood
February 14, 1977
DANDY DONSSir: Barry McDermott's article (The Streaks of San Francisco, Jan. 31) was refreshing and inspiring. Too often college athletes are scorned for being immature. Coaches and spectators have a tendency to forget that what they are dealing with is oversized teen-agers who just happen to excel in sports. Forward James Hardy said it best: "People forget I'm still a kid in a man's body."
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February 14, 1977

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

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DANDY DONS
Sir:
Barry McDermott's article (The Streaks of San Francisco, Jan. 31) was refreshing and inspiring. Too often college athletes are scorned for being immature. Coaches and spectators have a tendency to forget that what they are dealing with is oversized teen-agers who just happen to excel in sports. Forward James Hardy said it best: "People forget I'm still a kid in a man's body."

USF Coach Bob Gaillard has assembled perhaps the finest young basketball team in the country, and he has coordinated the players' efforts so that the team wins. But he has done it without the victory-at-all-costs routine. Gaillard has taught his players to work as a team without sacrificing personal glory. The results speak for themselves.

Whether the Dons continue at their present rate and go on to the NCAA finals is not the point. It is how they have achieved success that really matters. As Gaillard expressed it, "This is not a military site." Of course not, it's a college.
MARK SOLTAU
Palo Alto, Calif.

Sir:
There is no doubt in my mind that San Francisco has one of the best college basketball teams in the country, but the Dons wouldn't (and won't) stand a chance against such titans as UCLA, Marquette, North Carolina and Michigan. Considering the schedule the Dons have played so far, I don't see how they can be rated No. 1, even with their perfect record.
MIKE FRIEND
Omaha

Sir:
I thoroughly enjoyed Barry McDermott's article on the University of San Francisco, especially since I have not yet seen the Dons play. But please clear up one point. Why is it so confounding that Winford Boynes, at 6'�", plays guard? This should be his natural position.
CHARLES WRIGHT
Charlevoix, Mich.

?A typographical error reduced Boynes' height. He is 6'6�".—ED.

BIG PROBLEMS
Sir:
Thank goodness "words spoke louder than action" (Jan. 31) at the 71st annual NCAA convention and the Big Football babies did not get their way. It really is difficult to believe that it took Walter Byers' and J. Neils Thompson's committee a whole year to construct such an asinine proposal: reorganization based on a school's ability to compete in Division I in at least eight sports, football and basketball included, with an amendment for those schools with Division I basketball but no football allowing them to retain Division I status in only that one sport.

Since a host of Division I schools, including the University of San Francisco, whose basketball team was featured on your cover, do not field football teams, it is little wonder that the proposal was tabled. Does Big Football expect a school like Providence to play Division I basketball and then run Division II cross-country after placing third and ninth in the last two NCAA Division I cross-country championships? Ridiculous!

Almost as ridiculous was John Underwood's claim that there are no Notre Dame beaters in the Eastern College Athletic Conference. The Irish were recently beaten by Princeton and Villanova in Big Basketball. Oops, I almost forgot. Big Football is the only sport, isn't it?
TIMOTHY F. THOMPSON
Nashua, N.H.

THE OWNERS' SIDE
Sir:
I thought your article on the owners (Who Are These Guys? Jan. 31) was excellent. It proved that professional players are overpaid and that they are extremely greedy. They just don't seem to understand that owners have debts to pay, also. Something must be done about the "million dollar baby" attitude or, in the end, it will destroy sports.
CARL DICKINSON
East Hampton, N.Y.

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