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Yanks have 'em by the Gullett
Jim Kaplan
April 11, 1977
Why in the name of Red Ruffing would the Yankees, who already had the American League's best pitching and one of the world's biggest payrolls, shell out $2 million to sign a guy who won only 11 games last year and ended the season with his leg in a cast? That's easy. The pitcher's name is Don Gullett. To be sure, Gullett has had only 26 victories the last two seasons, during which he missed 20 starts because of injuries, but he also lost just seven games. After seven big-league years, all with the Reds, he has the best won-lost percentage (.684) among active pitchers. And Gullett is very active these days; the various ailments that limited his appearances in '75 and '76, including the tendon he dislocated in his right ankle while pitching the Reds to victory over the Yankees in the World Series opener last fall, seem healed. Other enticements for New York were Gullett's age—he's all of 26—and his left-handedness. Even today's modified Yankee Stadium still has enough vast spaces in left field that it seems as if it were designed by a lefty pitcher. Fastballer Gullett should be a big winner there, and the Yankees may need his victories; their only other left-handed starter, Ken Holtzman, seemed to be fading at the end of last season, and their ace, Catfish Hunter, suffers from a chronically sore shoulder.
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April 11, 1977

Yanks Have 'em By The Gullett

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Why in the name of Red Ruffing would the Yankees, who already had the American League's best pitching and one of the world's biggest payrolls, shell out $2 million to sign a guy who won only 11 games last year and ended the season with his leg in a cast? That's easy. The pitcher's name is Don Gullett. To be sure, Gullett has had only 26 victories the last two seasons, during which he missed 20 starts because of injuries, but he also lost just seven games. After seven big-league years, all with the Reds, he has the best won-lost percentage (.684) among active pitchers. And Gullett is very active these days; the various ailments that limited his appearances in '75 and '76, including the tendon he dislocated in his right ankle while pitching the Reds to victory over the Yankees in the World Series opener last fall, seem healed. Other enticements for New York were Gullett's age—he's all of 26—and his left-handedness. Even today's modified Yankee Stadium still has enough vast spaces in left field that it seems as if it were designed by a lefty pitcher. Fastballer Gullett should be a big winner there, and the Yankees may need his victories; their only other left-handed starter, Ken Holtzman, seemed to be fading at the end of last season, and their ace, Catfish Hunter, suffers from a chronically sore shoulder.

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