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19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
May 09, 1977
OUT OF THE PARKSir:In the photograph accompanying Rick Telander's article about Rich Buhrke, who collects baseballs hit out of Wrigley Field (At the Other End of the Rainbows, April 25), I see a football and six hockey pucks. Is he branching out?CASWELL SCHULTZ Ithaca, N.Y.
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May 09, 1977

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

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OUT OF THE PARK
Sir:
In the photograph accompanying Rick Telander's article about Rich Buhrke, who collects baseballs hit out of Wrigley Field (At the Other End of the Rainbows, April 25), I see a football and six hockey pucks. Is he branching out?
CASWELL SCHULTZ
Ithaca, N.Y.

?The football came off the toe of Lou Michaels of the Baltimore Colts, who kicked an extra point out of Wrigley Field in a game against the Chicago Bears on Oct. 8, 1967. Five of the six pucks sailed into the stands (and Buhrke's grasp) during games played by the defunct Chicago Cougars of the WHA at the Amphitheatre; the sixth came from a Black Hawk practice session at Chicago Stadium.—ED.

Sir:
I really appreciated the article on Rich Buhrke. It's about time someone connected with a sport was written about besides the overpaid, bellyaching players.
TED SICKLEY
Gladstone, N.J.

Sir:
In Sacramento in the summers of 1960 and 1961, I chased, caught and fought for batting practice and home-run balls at Edmonds Field, home of the AAA Sacramento Solons, a la Rich Buhrke. My prize possessions were home runs hit by Willie Mays (in an exhibition game), Willie McCovey of the Tacoma Giants and Willie Davis of the Spokane Indians. There aren't many major league parks where it is still practical and possible to chase homers. I hope the shaggers will be able to continue the art—shagging does require special talents and tenacity—for a long time.
MICHAEL N. KATAYANAGI
Brooklyn

WHITE-COLLAR BLUE JAYS?
Sir:
So Toronto has a baseball team (Tip of the Hat, Cut of the Bat, April 25). Big deal! Having visited "the good gray lady," we cannot understand the placing of a team playing an American game in so bland a Canadian city. Why not put a team in Buffalo instead? Here is an American city that supports the Sabres, Braves and Bills. Buffalo would draw on Toronto's millions and add to it more than a million and a half of her own population. What a slap in the face to the American worker that a team should be placed in white-collar Toronto rather than in blue-collar Buffalo.
MICHAEL F. DONOVAN
JOHN W. JERARD
Portland, Ore.

Sir:
You omit a very significant bit of information about Blue Jay first baseman, Doug Ault: he bats right-and throws left-handed. In 1976, 426 non-pitchers were listed on the spring-training rosters of the then 24 major league teams. Not one batted right and threw left!

The last major leaguer who did so was Cleon Jones of the New York Mets. Most baseball scouts show little interest in signing a B-R, T-L prospect.
ROBERT W. MILLER
West Seneca, N.Y.

NEPOTISM?
Sir:
Are Maury and Bump Wills (March 28) the first father-and-son pair to make the cover of SI at different times?
BARRY ROZNER
Wilmette, Ill.

?No. Bold Ruler (1957) and Secretariat (1973) were.—ED.

TRAVELING MEN?
Sir:
I'm surprised that neither SI nor its readers have commented on basketball's counterpart of baseball's "phantom" double play that officials continue to permit.

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