SI Vault
 
19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
May 16, 1977
YANKEE DOODLINGSir:What's so wrong if Reggie Jackson needs to be loved even though he gets a very high salary? Remember, man does not live by bread alone. If Jackson plays as well as he can, the Yankees and Yankee fans should show him the love and respect he will richly deserve. Some fans chant "Reggie! Reggie! Reggie!" when Reggie is playing well and the Yankees are winning, but boo when the going gets tough. I chanted, "Reggie! Reggie! Reggie!" when he became a Yankee, all through preseason, all through the losing streak and I shall continue to chant "Reggie! Reggie! Reggie!" through the rest of the season as he helps the Yankees win the 1977 pennant and the World Series.ROGER D. SPICKLER South Bend, Ind.
Decrease font Decrease font
Enlarge font Enlarge font
May 16, 1977

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

View CoverRead All Articles View This Issue

YANKEE DOODLING
Sir:
What's so wrong if Reggie Jackson needs to be loved even though he gets a very high salary? Remember, man does not live by bread alone. If Jackson plays as well as he can, the Yankees and Yankee fans should show him the love and respect he will richly deserve. Some fans chant "Reggie! Reggie! Reggie!" when Reggie is playing well and the Yankees are winning, but boo when the going gets tough. I chanted, "Reggie! Reggie! Reggie!" when he became a Yankee, all through preseason, all through the losing streak and I shall continue to chant "Reggie! Reggie! Reggie!" through the rest of the season as he helps the Yankees win the 1977 pennant and the World Series.
ROGER D. SPICKLER
South Bend, Ind.

Sir:
If Reggie Jackson wants to be loved so much, why didn't he have a clause in his contract that would allow George Steinbrenner to pick him up on his lap and tell him bedtime stories every night?
JON BLAKE
East Hartford, Conn.

Sir:
How fans can continue to root for the Yankees, with their immature and self-centered players and a manager who has all the tact of Idi Amin, is beyond me. The club would do well to remember the class exuded by its pinstriped forefathers.
RON JACKSON
Franklin, Ohio

McCOVEY COMES BACK
Sir:
I would like to thank you for your tribute to Willie McCovey (I'll Come Home to You, Said Willie, May 2). As a longtime Giant fan, I have always admired McCovey for his courage, integrity and, of course, his great ability as a player. Despite being hampered by many physical ailments, he was one of the premier players in the game for many years. Even at age 39 he is still a tremendous asset to the Giants and to baseball in general. His return is an unexpected bonus and one that Giant fans everywhere have been dreaming about for three years.
THOMAS J. ZESK
Kensington, Conn.

STICKY BUSINESS
Sir:
In your article You Can't Beat This Game With a Stick (April 25) you say, somewhat patronizingly, that lacrosse may never go "big time." If big time means playing for money instead of for the thrill of it, if going big time means big business overshadowing one of our last true amateur sports, then let's hope that lacrosse doesn't go big time.
GIL GIBBS
Lacrosse Coach
Montclair High School
Montclair, N.J.

Sir:
What mirthful memories your pictures of the lacrosse players evoked. Fifty years ago I played lacrosse at summer camp. The contrast between the equipment worn then and now is unbelievable. Our only equipment consisted of the usual girls gym uniform—navy-blue serge bloomers, shapeless white middy blouses, long black cotton stockings and very high sneakers. We did play with standard lacrosse sticks, though—lethal weapons in our no-holds-barred contests. I wore glasses and I had three pairs: one to wear, one in reserve, one laid up for repairs. A rare sight we must have been flying up and down the field bent on mayhem.

What ho, the players of today with their helmets, face masks, padded gloves, contact lenses—and insurance!
MRS. PAUL W. WARD
Tully, N.Y.

?Except for the goalies, women lacrosse players still wear little or no protective equipment.—ED.

CASH FLOW
Sir:
Peter Gammons says that Wayne Cashman broke his thumb (The Cash Was Laundered, May 2) while he was involved in "his only fight of the season," with the Kings' gentlemanly center, Smiling Vic Venasky. In reality it was the Kings' Neil Komadoski whose head Cashman pulled back by the hair and then belted with a steady stream of punches while Komadoski was gazing at the ceiling of the Boston Garden. Cashman got what he deserved.
SHERRY MILLER
Los Angeles

OUT OF THE PARK
Sir:
Too bad home-run ball-chaser Rich Buhrke (At the Other End of the Rainbows, April 25) wasn't around in 1935 or earlier. With less effort, he might have added to his collection a Wally Berger, Joe Medwick or Hank Lieber. In those days, Wrigley Field's brick left-field wall had no wire barrier atop it. which made it easier to hit homers. The mesh was erected when bleachers were built along the wall's interior in 1936.

Continue Story
1 2 3