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19TH HOLE: THE READER TAKE OVER
Edited by Gay Flood
November 07, 1977
SERIES REFLECTIONS Sir:Your World Series cover photograph (Oct. 24) was a triple play.MICHAEL G. HUTSKO Norwalk, Calif.
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November 07, 1977

19th Hole: The Reader Take Over

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Sir:
I had the TV on with the sound turned off. I listened to the games on AM radio. That way I missed the grating sound of Howard Cosell. I thought everyone did this. I do the same thing for Monday Night Football .
I. M. ELLIS
Dallas

Sir:
The only good thing to be said about ABC's World Series coverage was that for two glorious weeks Howard Cosell was not on Monday Night Football .
THOMAS HARLEY
Plattsburgh, N.Y.

Sir:
Your article slighted both ABC and Howard Cosell. For a long time my good wife "couldn't stand" Cosell. Then came Miz Lillian, who said she didn't like him either. Well, I like him! He has done a lot for sports that SPORTS ILLUSTRATED has seen fit to downgrade. Carry on, Howard.
JAKE SITZMAN
Canton, Ohio

Sir:
You failed to mention Keith Jackson. He, too, deserves a lot of credit for messing things up.
KEVIN LEWIS
Pocono Lake, Pa.

Sir:
I think I have it figured out. We should work out a trade between ABC and NBC, sending major league baseball back to the superior troops of Garagiola, Kubek et al., while returning the Olympic telecast to ABC, where it really belongs. Then we will all be happy.
PAUL R. TURNER
Bloomington, Ind.

NOT SO BAD NEWS BARNES
Sir:
I enjoyed John Papanek's article on Marvin Barnes (This Time the News is Good. Oct. 24). However, I must point out one significant error. Barnes did not settle the $1.5 million damage suit with Larry Ketvirtis. A jury awarded $10,000 to Ketvirtis for compensatory damages (medical bills, etc.). The jury made no award for punitive damages.

One final point: this was the only one of Barnes' trials to be carried to a jury verdict—and that verdict shows that perhaps the public and the media have been too quick to judge this man.
MIKE CAREY
Boston

ONE MORE FOR THE 3-4
Sir:
The article Say Hello to the Fearsome Threesome (Oct. 17) caught my eye because the St. Barnabas 7th- and 8th-grade team in Southwest Philadelphia, the team I play for, uses the 3-4 defense. I play linebacker and I must say that our linebackers are in on about 85% of the tackles. But our front three are very good. They usually make the initial hit. We started using this defensive attack long before it became popular, so we have just about perfected it. You can add St. Barnabas to your undefeated list because we are now 7-0 and haven't lost a game (preseason, regular season or postseason) in two years. I think our head coach, Mike Hisler, is going to stick with the 3-4.
MIKE HOBAN
Philadelphia

HIPP POINTER
Sir:
Nebraska has a publicity man's dream in I. M. Hipp (I.M. the Wonder Walk-On, Oct. 24). In addition to his obvious talents and catchy name, Hipp can be the first college runner to have an entire offense named after him. Just wait until next year when Nebraska's version of the wishbone—"the Hippbone"—starts to dominate college football.
ELLIS ANMUTH
Philadelphia

THE KNEE
Sir:
As a veteran of three knee operations, I was especially interested in William Oscar Johnson's article describing the various types of knee trauma and the ways in which that joint, so vital to athletic participation, can fail (This Strange and Perilous Joint, Oct. 24). It appears that Johnson did extensive research in the area, but I must take issue with his description of the arthrogram as a relatively painless experience. Painless in comparison to what? Having a large needle inserted into one's knee, and then having liquid dye and air forced into the joint (followed by a series of movements designed to allow the physician to observe the various structures within the joint) is not a pleasant experience. Compared to the agony of surgery, an arthrogram is relatively painless, but it is certainly not something I would look forward to going through again. Following Johnson's reasoning, being punched out by Ken Norton or Earnie Shavers would be relatively painless—compared to being run over by a loaded dump truck.
ROY L. RICHTER
Montgomery City, Mo.

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