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19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
Edited by Gay Flood
November 21, 1977
SEMI-TOUGHSir:Very unsportsmanlike conduct, SI. You slighted all the thousands of real athletes throughout the world by opting to feature Kris Kristofferson, Burt Reynolds and Jill Clayburgh—Jill Clayburgh?—on the cover (Nov. 7). How could you? The article Semi-Tough Goes to the Movies was even more unsportsmanlike. A busted play.RICHARD S. QUINTANACochiti, N. Mex.
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November 21, 1977

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

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Sir:
Your article concerning baseball's free agents was one of the fairest accounts I've read. It brought out an interesting point: the money paid free agents is for the most part spread out via multi-year contracts. Therefore the failure or success of a particular player should not be judged on one season alone.
ROBERT C. SCHOETTLE
Charlottesville, Va.

Sir:
Why does everyone keep saying that Gene Tenace, who hit .233 last season, had a disappointing year? His lifetime average before 1977 was .245. He has never hit 30 home runs or driven in 90 runs. Who ever said that he was a good defensive catcher? Just because someone gives him a fortune, is he now supposed to be a superstar, or even a respectable big league hitter?
T. E. REA
Ringoes, N.J.

IN SEARCH OF NANTUCKET BLUES
Sir:
Are you sure that the name of the author of your article Tumult on a Wild Shore (Nov. 7) isn't William Melville Humphrey? Our numerous visits to Nantucket's Great Point have been made in a Wagoneer loaded with fishing gear, children, coolers, blankets, charcoal and a picnic supper. We always make the trip in the late afternoon, for there is nothing like seeing the sun sinking behind the Great Point lighthouse. On arrival, mothers set up camp, children play hide-and-seek in the dunes and, 90% of the time, the men pull in blues. After a meal of hamburgers and fresh grilled blue-fish, we sit around the fire enjoying ghost and fish stories. Although the trip is far from comfortable, the children often fall asleep on the return rather than arriving home "battered and bruised from our wild ride...."
EMMA WARD
Riverside, Conn.

Sir:
William Humphrey's article totally swept me off my feet. Fantastic!
PAUL CRONIN
New York City

TOP-ROOKIE TRADES
Sir:
I believe Adrian Dantley of the Indianapolis Pacers erred when he said he was the only Rookie of the Year in any sport to be traded after having won the award (Scouting Reports, Oct. 31). I recall that Bill Virdon was traded by the St. Louis Cardinals to the Pittsburgh Pirates after the 1955 season, in which he was named National League Rookie of the Year.
TIMOTHY J. MILLER
Erie, Pa.

Sir:
Adrian Dantley is mistaken. After he won Co-Rookie of the Year honors in 1976 with the Cincinnati Reds, Pat Zachry was traded to the New York Mets in the Tom Seaver deal. (Zachry shared the award with Butch Metzger of the San Diego Padres.)
NEALE X. TRANGUCH
Hazleton, Pa.

ON THEIR TOES
Sir:
In the article They're Kicking Up a Real Storm (Nov. 7) you stated that Russell Erxleben would be unable to wear a square-toed kicking shoe in the NFL. If I am not mistaken, Ray Guy and Errol Mann of Oakland, Jim Turner of Denver, Fred Cox of Minnesota, Jim Bakken of St. Louis, Mark Moseley of Washington and ex-Ram Tom Dempsey all wore or are now wearing square-toed shoes.
STAN FINCH
Altavista, Va.

?Right. A regulation square-toed kicking shoe is allowed by the NFL.—ED.

UNDEFEATED AND...?
Sir:
Bruce Milligan's letter (Oct. 17) and your article Is Colgate Going To Be Squeezed Out Again? (Nov. 7) lament the fact that Colgate was not selected for the Rose Bowl in 1932. Undoubtedly, one of the principal reasons Colgate was "unscored upon, undefeated and uninvited" was the fact that after trampling St. Lawrence, the Red Raiders played Case School of Applied Science. In that game Colgate was unable to penetrate the Case line and had to rely upon its exalted passing game to win.

After the game, Colgate Coach Andy Kerr led a group of reporters and photographers into the Case dressing room and was photographed between four members of the Case team. Thereupon he told the press, "These four men can play on any team in this country." The New York newspapers noted the incident and pointed out that Case was an "unheard of school in the Midwest.
ROBERT W. SEIFERT
Pittsburgh

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