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19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
Edited by Gay Flood
December 05, 1977
AFC VS. NFC Sir:I found Joe Marshall's story on the superiority of the American Football Conference (Vince, You Wouldn't Believe It. Nov. 21) pretty ridiculous. I'm sure I could make as strong a case for the NFC. I would simply start with Walter Payton. Then I would mention that Seattle (AFC) traded a first-round draft choice to the Dallas Cowboys (NFC), who picked Tony Dorsett. The leading passer in all of pro football is Pat Haden (NFC). Second is Roger Staubach (NFC). Jim Hart (NFC) is ahead of Steve Grogan and Ken Anderson. Baltimore, led by NFLers John Unitas and Earl Morrall, won the Super Bowl before Bert Jones was drafted.
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December 05, 1977

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

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I finished my high school career four years ago, but after reading the article I could almost taste the dirt from the grass drills and see my former teammates again. I hope your other readers identified with the story as much as I did.
CARL BUSSETT
Walker Valley, N.Y.

Sir:
As a past player and a junior high coach, I think the article says a lot about high school football and its effect on everyone involved. I can relate to the various individuals on the Vicksburg team, as they are representative of youngsters all over the country. Bil Gilbert did a great job of getting the feeling across. STEPHEN D. WOLKOFF
Indianapolis

Sir:
Bil Gilbert's Senior Season was unmercifully long and hopelessly clich�.
JOHN ERYSIAN
San Diego

ATLANTA'S CRISS
Sir:
The emergence of Charlie Criss as a star in the NBA (Very Short and Sweet in Atlanta , Nov. 14) comes as no surprise to those of us who had the opportunity and pleasure of watching him perform his basketball wizardry in the Eastern Basketball League. Having lived in Allentown, Pa., home of the Allentown Jets, I was able to see several games between the Jets and the Scranton Apollos, Criss' team. It was not a rarity to find at the end of a game that Criss alone had outscored the entire backcourt of the Jets. A 40-point game from this human spark plug was a frequent occurrence.
TODD S. RAYMIS
Hampton, Va.

Sir:
Jerry Kirshenbaum's article on Atlanta's Charlie Criss is inspiring. What professional basketball needs is more people of Criss' determination.
GARY CUNNINGHAM
Lakeland, Fla.

REVIEWING THE REVIEW
Sir:
Jonathan Yardley's review of The Game They Played by Stanley Cohen (BOOKTALK, Oct. 24) was shallow and unkind. Both my son and I read the book, and we enjoyed it immensely.

To say the book was irritating because Cohen injects himself into the story is asinine. The author's reminiscences, especially when he takes a walk with his son through the streets where he spent his childhood and to the schoolyard where he played basketball, were sensitive and heartwarming.

Clearly, Yardley's review was based upon regional animosity and a distaste for New York. That is all well and good, but it hardly contributes to an objective review. I thought the book was great.
GEORGE GROSSMAN
Whitestone, N.Y.

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