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AIMING TO SET UP AN UPSET
Mark Mulvoy
May 29, 1978
Roaring back from a two-game deficit, the scrappy Boston Bruins whipped the lordly Montreal Canadiens twice and threatened to turn the Stanley Cup series upside down
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May 29, 1978

Aiming To Set Up An Upset

Roaring back from a two-game deficit, the scrappy Boston Bruins whipped the lordly Montreal Canadiens twice and threatened to turn the Stanley Cup series upside down

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The Canadiens attacked Cheevers only 16 times, mostly from such long range that he hardly worked up a sweat. The Bruins, for their part, ripped 36 shots at Dryden. "The Bruins loved the game," he said. "They had the times of their lives. It was sheer enjoyment to them because they could do everything they wanted. I don't recall any game in which we were dominated over 60 minutes. The tide never came close to turning."

Surely it was a fluke. Boston was due.

"It was no fluke," Dryden said. "We were really hammered, and when you're hammered it's never a fluke."

Down the hall, Cheevers relaxed in his white terry cloth robe—Royal Ski, the name of a racehorse Cheevers syndicated last season for a reported $1.3 million, is emblazoned on the back—and sipped a beer. "Well, we've done one thing nobody thought we'd do." he said. "We put some interest back into the finals."

Indeed they had. And after Sunday night's victory there was more than interest in the air. There was the distinct possibility, as Park put it, that no team is invincible. Even the invincible Canadiens.

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