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19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
Edited by Gay Flood
July 03, 1978
FINAL WORDSSir: John Papanek's article on the exciting seventh and final game of the NBA championships in Seattle (They're First, At Long Last, June 19) was disappointing and insulting. It is hardly relevant that President Jimmy Carter was kept waiting by the Bullets, while his helicopter idled on the South Lawn ready to whisk him off for a weekend at Camp David. What is relevant is that the Bullets were detained by thousands of Washingtonians who had gathered at the Capital Centre and along the parade route to cheer and welcome them home. This tremendous outpouring of affection, so seldom seen in this city, was a sight to behold.SHERYL B. EVERED Silver Spring, Md.
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July 03, 1978

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

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FINAL WORDS
Sir:
John Papanek's article on the exciting seventh and final game of the NBA championships in Seattle (They're First, At Long Last, June 19) was disappointing and insulting. It is hardly relevant that President Jimmy Carter was kept waiting by the Bullets, while his helicopter idled on the South Lawn ready to whisk him off for a weekend at Camp David. What is relevant is that the Bullets were detained by thousands of Washingtonians who had gathered at the Capital Centre and along the parade route to cheer and welcome them home. This tremendous outpouring of affection, so seldom seen in this city, was a sight to behold.
SHERYL B. EVERED
Silver Spring, Md.

Sir:
Granted, it was the longest basketball season ever. Granted, it ended in the middle of the baseball, soccer, golf and track seasons. Still, 70 pages are a lot to thumb through to find out who won the NBA title. What if you had decided to have a 68-page issue instead of a 100-page one?
DAVID PAULSON
Columbia, Md.

Sir:
The fact that the No. 1 sports magazine had somehow found the time and energy to devote one and a half pages to the Bullets' biggest accomplishment ever was truly inspirational, and that lone black and white photograph had us Bullet fans in a state of ecstasy.
DONALD C. JEFFRIES
Annandale, Va.

Sir:
We agree that a horse winning the Triple Crown deserves to be on the cover, but when you choose to write more about Alaskan baseball than a world champion basketball team, something is wrong.
PHIL JOYCE
DARRYL PRICE
New Carrollton, Md.

AH, NANCY!
Sir:
What really burns me up is that Nancy Lopez was given only a two-page article in your June 19 issue (All Smiles While She Tears Up the Tour) despite all she has done for the LPGA in her rookie season. Affirmed and Alydar ran a tremendous race in the Belmont, and I am proud to have been a witness to that great event, but what does Nancy have to do to get more coverage?
LEE LAMBERTS
Grand Rapids, Mich.

Sir:
Nancy Lopez is the best thing ever to happen to women's golf. A standout with talent and personality to match is just what the doctor ordered for the LPGA, as Barry McDermott pointed out. Lopez' tremendous play and popularity should benefit the women's tour in two areas: much more national television coverage and increased purses. Right now Lopez and all the rest of the women are playing major league golf for minor league money. Lopez could well be the force to change all this.
BRIAN HEYMAN
Ossining, N.Y.

Sir:
It's early yet, but it's becoming obvious that golf's new ace, Nancy Lopez, is the Sportswoman of the Year.
SHARON L. RAYMOND
Chevy Chase, Md.

HOGAN, PALMER AND NICKLAUS
Sir:
There's never been a story like Dan Jenkins' There's Never Been an Open Like it (June 19) on the 1960 U.S. Open. Thanks, Dan. We needed that.
MICHAEL G. HUTSKO
Norwalk, Calif.

TRAFFIC JAM
Sir:
In reference to Dan Jenkins' article Simons Says: Play Faster (May 29) about Jack Nicklaus' Memorial Tournament, I would like to point out some facts. In one paragraph, Jenkins states that "the rain eliminated parking in the fields." Then in the next paragraph he lists all the inconvenient places in which patrons were made to park. Where did he expect them to park, since the fields were unavailable? Every effort was made to overcome, in an orderly fashion, the inconvenience caused by the rain.

In addition to this, he takes a cheap shot at the "traffic cops" and their efforts to maintain order, with thousands of vehicles daily trying to park close to the clubhouse when no space was available. One thing Jenkins didn't point out, as he should have, was that 210 members of the Fraternal Order of Police volunteered more than 2,500 hours of their personal time at Muirfield on behalf of the Children's Hospital Charity Fund.

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