SI Vault
 
19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
Edited by Gay Flood
August 14, 1978
YANKEE DOODLINGSir:Congratulations to Larry Keith for an outstanding article (A Bunt That Went Boom! July 31). It shows the side of Reggie Jackson many people despise and the side of Billy Martin many respect.WALLY WALKUP JR.Beckley, W. Va.
Decrease font Decrease font
Enlarge font Enlarge font
August 14, 1978

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

View CoverRead All Articles View This Issue

YANKEE DOODLING
Sir:
Congratulations to Larry Keith for an outstanding article (A Bunt That Went Boom! July 31). It shows the side of Reggie Jackson many people despise and the side of Billy Martin many respect.
WALLY WALKUP JR.
Beckley, W. Va.

Sir:
Terrific article! It proved one thing to me: Reggie Jackson is the most conceited and overpaid player in all of sports. I don't understand why he's considered a superstar when his season average has never been above .293. And when a man getting paid $580,000 has been unable to execute a successful sacrifice bunt for six years, something is obviously wrong. Nobody will ever convince me that Jackson didn't know he was a very poor bunter when he defied management, so I feel Martin's actions were fully justified.

Because Martin will again manage the Yankees in 1980 (Doing Much...and Much Ado, Aug. 7), I hope this means Jackson will be gone by then.
DAVID SLATCHER
Malvern, Pa.

Sir:
Reggie Jackson gets my vote simply for retaining his sanity since joining the Yankees. I hope he has another great year!
VIVIAN WEAVER
Houston

Sir:
Shipbuilder George Steinbrenner's latest version of a Yankee team is sinking fast. Without Skipper Billy Martin at the helm, the Yankee Clipper (no relation to Joe) has struck a REGGIE! bar in Boston Harbor and is now stuck with a Lemon. There is no escape, because the Rivers is dry and the ship has a Dent in it. It's there in black and White. The staff is getting baseballs rammed down its Gullett. Their Goose is cooked. Second Baseman Willie has become Won't He and the Munson Burner has fallen victim to the gas shortage. Could a Spark ignite him? No, I can hear Taps Blairing. What will happen next? It's hard to Figueroa. Can Tallis tell us? Guidry is giddy, but the Beattie goes on and the Hunter has become the hunted. They're living on Tid Row. I just can't Berra it! What the Houk can I do?
SCOTT BENDIN
Floral Park, N.Y.

Sir:
Help! Please, I don't want to hear another word about the continuing drama of the New York Yankees and Billy Martin. The only possible conclusion to this bizarre media overkill is for Martin to give birth to a test-tube baby while trying to cross the Atlantic Ocean in a balloon.
WILLIAM G. PAPA
New York City

BAMBI'S BOMBERS
Sir:
In Larry Keith's article A Bunt That Went Boom (July 31), he says, "In various ways Steinbrenner, Jackson, fate—and the Red Sox—all worked against [ Billy Martin]." Do you mean that the Brewers, who have won nine of 10 from New York, including all seven at Milwaukee this year, haven't had an effect on the Yankees' fourth-place standing?
DAN VAN HANDEL
DAVE VAN HANDEL
Appleton, Wis.

Sir:
On the day this letter is being typed (July 27), the Milwaukee Brewers are proud owners of the leading candidate for Rookie of the Year ( Paul Molitor), two of the top five home-run hitters in the American League ( Gorman Thomas and Larry Hisle), two of the winningest pitchers in the majors (Lary Sorensen and Mike Caldwell), one of the leading hitters in the American League ( Sixto Lezcano), the third-best record in either league and several players near the top in just about every major league category except Big League Malcontents.

We know it's hard for you to believe, but there is exciting, topnotch baseball being played in cities other than Boston and New York.
TIM KELLEY
KEN MILLER
JIM CAMPBELL
Hustisford, Wis.

BRAVE TALK
Sir:
Give us good ol' boys down here in Atlanta a break (BASEBALL'S WEEK, July 31)! The last major league pitcher before Cleveland's Mike Paxton to fan four batters in one inning was our own Philip H. Niekro on July 29, 1977 in a 5-3 win over the Pirates. Somebody apparently misread The Book of Baseball Records. Mike Cuellar (May 29, 1970) was the last American League pitcher to perform the feat.
ROB FIELDS
Atlanta Braves Television
WTCG-TV
Atlanta

Continue Story
1 2 3