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MAKING ANOTHER KIND OF PITCH
Melissa Ludtke Lincoln
September 18, 1978
At first glance the subjects looked easy, the sort of gut courses that college students dream about. USC undergraduate Tom Seaver, already gainfully employed as a major league pitcher, needed 18 more credits for his B.S. degree. A professor lined them up: for geology, Seaver would test the soils in National League infields; for geography, he would trace the spread of baseball around the world; and for a final journalism paper, he would analyze how local television and radio stations covered the game. That was in 1971, and this is to report that Seaver not only got his diploma, but he has also parlayed his studies, plus what broadcasters call his recognition factor, into a second career as a sportscaster.
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September 18, 1978

Making Another Kind Of Pitch

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Despite the many television hours already consumed by sports, stations serving 70% of the country's sets carry Greatest Sports Legends. Alan Lubell, the distributor, says, "In two years who will remember who played in the NBA finals last June? But the legends stand out. Who can forget Ted Williams?" If the program lasts another 10 years, Legends may want to do the obvious show. But how can Seaver interview Seaver?

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